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I'm new to Linux & am just getting started with Mandriva 10.2. I've downloaded 7 programs of which 2 are .exe. I guess that these are for Windows & that ...
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    Installing D/l'ed Progs On Mandriva Linux


    I'm new to Linux & am just getting started with Mandriva 10.2.

    I've downloaded 7 programs of which 2 are .exe. I guess that these are for Windows & that I'll need to delete them?

    1 of the others is a Zip Archive & the other 4 are Gzip files which I guess are useable. I can click on them and open them but haven't a clue how to instal them. Any ideas? Many Thanks.

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    Just Joined! Nazty's Avatar
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    You need to have the components of the GCC (Gnu C Compiler) and QT installed on your
    Mandriva Linux... Your problem is similar to mine! Look "Compiler problem'' for details!
    You can also take a look at this Howto ...


    One more useful link...

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    Many Thanks for that ...... I'll get back here when I've given it a try ....

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    Linux Guru AlexK's Avatar
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    In future, I would suggest you try and download rpm files of programs, then it is very simple to install them, either double click on it and Mandriva should attempt to install it for you, or install from the command line with:
    Code:
    rpm -ivh program_name.rpm
    i = install
    v = verbose, i.e. print out messages
    h = print ### to show how much longer.

    The tutorial Nazty linked to explains in more detail howto install different software.
    Life is complex, it has a real part and an imaginary part.

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    Thanks - it's a lot to get my head around!

    ........... be back later

  7. #6
    Linux Newbie sabin's Avatar
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    It's really not a problem that you have to ask, i'd say that "software installation" is the greater difference between the MS-Windows and Linux difference, for a windows user trying Linux.

    I'll post a few things about that subject in case it can help you...
    That's really newbie stuff, but if's you're a real newbie you'll find it helpful... as a newbie, for me, those elements took me a full day to discover, because when something is a bit too obvious from an experienced point of view, it's not explained enough

    If you want i'll say it that way : there are three methods for installing a program :

    - from the source code : in the folder containing the source code, you'll need to run in a console ("konsole") : "./configure", "make", "make install".

    - when the program is an .rpm, meaning it's already fully preconfigured for your distribution, in a console as the root user you can either run "rpm -ivh program_name.rpm", or run "urpmi program_name". Or run "mcc" to start Mandriva configuration tool, chose "software installation", and enter the name you want in the search field, it will search for your program in a database of about 10 000 programs already preconfigured in rpm format

    - when the program is a "binary" : ie a proprietary program, nondisclosed source, you'll have to run the program's name in a console, but that case is VERY rare, for instance installing nvidia drivers or adobe acrobat for linux. Just write "./program_name.run".

    To start a console, do alt-F2, and write "konsole" without the quotes.

    Sometimes, in the console, you'll need to run programs as root instead as your own user. To do so, write "su" as command, it will ask for the root's password, and then you'll be logged as root. As root you can perform administrator commands, like installing rpm packages, for instance. But never run things as root when you can run them as a single user instead !!! For instance, "make install" will make the program available for YOUR user when it's ran as yourself, or for ALL USERS when it's ran as root. To log off the root user, just run "exit" in the console.

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