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I installed a Geforce 4 (Generic)64mb in my P4 Asus 2.4 Cel in place of the onboard SIS VGA To play Quake 4 in Windoze. Mandrake 10.2 is all scrambled ...
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  1. #1
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    Cool Video Card swap gone bad


    I installed a Geforce 4 (Generic)64mb in my P4 Asus 2.4 Cel in place of the onboard SIS VGA To play Quake 4 in Windoze. Mandrake 10.2 is all scrambled ...tried to recover....to reinstall ....Linux found the card but still scrambled lowered refresh rate and resolution to 800x600 .... still scrambled in linux. Looking for ideas ...not the best in Linux protocol so tell me step by step if there is something that I have not done....thanx

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    Quote Originally Posted by amayzing
    I installed a Geforce 4 (Generic)64mb in my P4 Asus 2.4 Cel in place of the onboard SIS VGA To play Quake 4 in Windoze. Mandrake 10.2 is all scrambled ...tried to recover....to reinstall ....Linux found the card but still scrambled lowered refresh rate and resolution to 800x600 .... still scrambled in linux. Looking for ideas ...not the best in Linux protocol so tell me step by step if there is something that I have not done....thanx
    http://www.nvidia.com/object/unix.html is where you'll find the nvidia driver. You'll also need to get the readme file (which seems really long, but the actual instructions aren't too bad).

    Then, you'll have to make sure that you have the kernel and the kernel sources (obviously you've got the kernel - otherwise you wouldn't be posting from a linux system).

    Open a terminal (konsole or what you want to call it) and issue the
    Code:
    uname -r
    command. it will reply with the kernel version number that you're using.

    then open the MCC (configure my computer) - the kernel sources will either be listed in updates or in rpmdrake+ (it depends on whether you've modified the mirror sources or not as to whether it comes from an install disc or a mirror - see http://easyurpmi.zarb.org/
    for that). The package to install will be called kernel-sources-the same number as you got from the uname -r command. If it isn't there then you might have to find out about updating your kernel first (though if you got the kernel version from an install disc, the kernel sources should be present/listed). Install them.

    Then read the readme file that you got from the nvidia site - theres precise instructions on how to install the driver - you have to kill your X server (the bit that provides the graphical facilities) - you can either switch it by doing the
    Code:
    init 3
    command or by hitting ctrl+alt+backspace until it stops trying to restart.

    Then log in as root - then change directory to wherever you downloaded the actual nvidia driver from - something like
    Code:
    cd /home/amayzing
    then from the instructions put in the command that it says - exactly as it says, except make sure that the file name is the same as the one that you downloaded
    Code:
    sh NVIDIA-Linux-x86-1.0-8178-pkg1.run
    is for the current IA32 (intel 32 bit cpu) version.

    You will have to then agree to their licence (using arrow keys to highlight and then hit enter).

    You get a load of stuff on screen but at the end, it tells you whether it's installed successfully.

    Then you need to make a couple of changes to the xorg.conf file - so that probably means using vi - you will have to check out vi so that you can open the file, make the small changes (listed in the readme file), then save and quit (you have to do put vi /etc/X11/xorg.conf command in, then using the arrow keys, scroll it down to the bit you want to change, hit insert key, make the changes, then hit esc key, then :wq (thats colon wq) for it to save and quit).

    Thats it. If you changed to the text login with the
    Code:
    init 3
    command, then change it back to
    Code:
    init 5
    and restart or startx.

    You'll know if you've got it right, because you'll get the nvidia splash screen.

    I know it looks like a lot, but it isn't really - if a complete idiot like me can manage it, then anyone can. It's worth remembering this, because whenever you see new kernel sources listed in the updates, that means that theres a new kernel available - and they don't just bung them out for no reason - it's worth finding out about that because it's often security related.

    That isn't much more difficult to do either - you just have to make sure that the new version is installed and listed in the bootloader - then when thats done you have to re-install the nvidia driver with the new kernel and kernel-sources.

    Hopefully that helps some

    regards

    John

    p.s. Oh and if you didn't do it when you installed the graphics card, don't forget you probably also need to check your BIOS settings so that the onboard chip is disabled.

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