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I'm new to linux, and I just installed Mandriva 2006 on a 11GB partition. After the installation I tried to start linux and it passes all of the initial checks, ...
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    Mandriva does not start up


    I'm new to linux, and I just installed Mandriva 2006 on a 11GB partition. After the installation I tried to start linux and it passes all of the initial checks, then the screen turns blue and there is an hourglass in the middle. Then the hourglass goes away and it turns into a cursor. I can move the mouse around, but nothing happens after that. What do I do? I've installed twice now with the same results.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    What kind of box are you installing on? Please give us some specs. so we have an idea of the hardware you're using.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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    Linux Engineer Nerderello's Avatar
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    don't really know. But try:-

    Press Ctrl Alt F1 at the same time. If you are presented with a black screen with white text with a login prompt, enter root and when prompted enter the root password (you may know it as the superuser or the admin user) that you setup during the install. Now that you're in Linux at the command line , enter tail --lines 45 /var/log/messages . The screen will scroll the last 45 lines of the system log. Reading this may give you a clue (pressing the shift and the page up keys, will scroll you up to the text that has scrolled off the top of the screen).

    Nerderello

    Use Suse 10.1 and occasionally play with Kubuntu
    Also have Windows 98SE and BeOS

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    System info:
    AMD Athlon 64 3800+ 2.4Ghz
    DFI Lanparty UT NF4
    EVGA 256MB 7800 GT 500MHz/1240
    Seagate 160GB internal ATA drive
    Sony DVD burner
    Seagate 250GB external drive

  5. #5
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmham1586
    System info:
    AMD Athlon 64 3800+ 2.4Ghz
    DFI Lanparty UT NF4
    EVGA 256MB 7800 GT 500MHz/1240
    Seagate 160GB internal ATA drive
    Sony DVD burner
    Seagate 250GB external drive
    Hmmm not sure. I would definitely try what Nerderello said above. It could be that some of your hardware isn't properly supported, or that you have an incomplete distro on your installation disks. It's always very hard to tell when you have the situation you describe. Maybe your motherboard's chipset doesn't have complete support: something to think about.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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    Pressing ctrl alt F1 doesn't bring up a logon screen. I reinstalled again with gnome instead of kde and i got a login screen, but when I logged in there were lines through the screen and it froze up the same way it did with the blue screen in kde. I can move the mouse but nothing on the keyboard will get me any further.

  7. #7
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmham1586
    Pressing ctrl alt F1 doesn't bring up a logon screen. I reinstalled again with gnome instead of kde and i got a login screen, but when I logged in there were lines through the screen and it froze up the same way it did with the blue screen in kde. I can move the mouse but nothing on the keyboard will get me any further.
    It could be a poorly supported video card in that case. Are you using an ATI? Most people on here would point you towards using NVidia, which are well supported (drivers are available for Linux). Also if video support is built into your motherboard, this might not have good support.

    I would bet money on this being a hardware issue. I personally use an ATI 9000, but some of the later models actually have less support.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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    I'm pretty sure you're on the right track with the video cards. This time I got farther than the blue screen. It got to another screen which I assume was a welcome screen, but the text was so screwed up that I couldn't read it. I am using an NVIDIA card though. It is an NVIDIA GeFORCE 7800 GT 256MB, so I figured I would use the NVIDIA GeFORCE 256 drivers, but they don't appear to be the right ones.

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    When I hit the 'test' button for the graphics settings, It goes to a gray screen with a cursor, but I can't figure out how to get out of the test.

  10. #10
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Sounds like it might be a buggy (or incomplete) open source driver for your card. I could well be burned at the stake for saying this, but some of them are crap. I think I remember reading a few threads where people have said, 'I used the open source driver and it didn't work, so I downloaded the proprietary one and it was fine'.

    The problem is then, how do you go about installing it when you can't even boot into the gui? I suppose you're going to need a command line, but you're having trouble accessing one, so I don't know what to suggest.

    Having said that, check out this page for drivers! : http://www.nvidia.com/object/unix.html

    Someone else will - I hope - help you find a command line. You might find you need to do the following if you can get a CLI :

    1. Compile the driver from source
    2. Use the modprobe command to insert the driver into the Linux kernel

    Doing 1 & 2 isn't all that hard with a bit of help. You might be interested to know that some existing hardware is poorly designed and runs on buggy software, so it's not always the fault of the open source developer. Just trying to avoid the lynch mobs!
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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