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sorry for putting 2 questions into one post, but I thought that this is better than opening 2 threads. 1. I installed package oooqs so I could start Open Office ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! randomAccess's Avatar
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    2 problems with PCLinuxOS


    sorry for putting 2 questions into one post, but I thought that this is better than opening 2 threads.

    1. I installed package oooqs so I could start Open Office faster. I compiled the code, and everything was OK. But first, when I click ALT+F2 and type 'oooqs' the program won't open. But when I give him the full path '/usr/local/kde/bin/oooqs' the programs starts. I right-click on him and whatever option I choose (ex. Textdocument or similar), no Open Office apllication is started. What am I doing wrong?

    Also whenever I log in, oooqs notifies me that it must be started as root. Where and how to fix this?

    2. I recently asked about problem writting on NTFS partion and some guy advised me how to use umask. I followed his instructions, but I still cannot write on NTFS. Here is my fstab file

    Code:
    # /dev/hda1, size=40965687, type=7: NTFS (primary)
    /dev/hda1	/mnt/win_c	ntfs	user,exec,ro,noauto,iocharset=iso8859-1,umask=0	0 0
    
    # /dev/hda5, size=103233627, type=7: NTFS (extended)
    /dev/hda5	/mnt/win_d	ntfs	user,exec,ro,noauto,iocharset=iso8859-1,umask=0	0 0
    what is wrong here?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    Not sure about the open office problem, as I don't use it.
    But for the Ntfs writing, n your fstab you have an "ro" in your options.
    That is one of the reasons you can not write to it, the other is that you need to install something like "captive-ntfs".
    Writing to ntfs from linux is not very good right now as MS won't release the specs so linux developers can write programs for it.

    Your best bet would be to create a fat32 partition so both linux and Windows can acces it.
    This could be a partition on your current hard drive, an extra hard drive, or get a USB drive.
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  3. #3
    Just Joined! randomAccess's Avatar
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    Well that is what I thought, but then I herad many Linux users saying they safely use NTFS. I mainly need it as file storage (docs, zipped files, etc.), especially for storing Text (word and similar) and Spreadsheet files. Do you think it is safe storing such files?

  4. #4
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    I have heard of many linux users safely using NTFS, meaning that they don't write to it.

    Storing such files where? On a fat32 device?
    How to know if you are a geek.
    when you respond to "get a life!" with "what's the URL?"
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  5. #5
    Just Joined! randomAccess's Avatar
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    No. storing them on NTFS. You think that might be problems even though they're text and zipped files? You know, I always found NTFS unsafe to have program folders on it.

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