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It's been six months since I last used my Linux system (installed in a second HD as backup system in case Windows explodes). Well, the problem is quite simple (I ...
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  1. #1
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    Don't want to login as root


    It's been six months since I last used my Linux system (installed in a second HD as backup system in case Windows explodes). Well, the problem is quite simple (I hope). Don't know why but when it starts it prompts me to login and to enter my password. Tryed a few times to login as a user but I had no luck (really don't know if I'm missing the user name or the password). I have no problems to login as root since I have de password for that. What I want (and considering that as root I should be allmight in my on PC) is to see a list with all the users and passwords in my system. It should not be such a long list since (as I remember) there's is only one user (me). Hope someone could help. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kabongo
    Don't know why but when it starts it prompts me to login and to enter my password. Tryed a few times to login as a user but I had no luck (really don't know if I'm missing the user name or the password). I have no problems to login as root since I have de password for that.
    If you're able to log in as root user, why not simply create a new regular user account for yourself? As root you have to ability to access all the files in your previous user account's folders and copy them over, changing the permissions to the new user.

    What I want (and considering that as root I should be allmight in my on PC) is to see a list with all the users and passwords in my system. It should not be such a long list since (as I remember) there's is only one user (me). Hope someone could help. Thanks.
    Unfortunately I don't think this is possible. Sure, you can see a list of all the users on a system in your /etc/passwd or /etc/shadow files, but the passwords themselves are encrypted via a one-way algorithm.
    Registered Linux user #270181
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  3. #3
    Linux User Kojak's Avatar
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    Don't forget that linux is case sensitive. Thus password is not PassworD.
    Windows free since 2002 | computing since 1984

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  5. #4
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    Thanks for the help. First of all, I just want to say that creating a new account was my Plan B. I really want to try to recover my old account first (Plan A), in case it didn't work I would be forced to try something else. Well the problem was solved when I viewed the password file (with my old username). Luckly I always use the same password depending on the username (maybe it's not safe but sure it makes easier to remember all your stuff). Thank you again.

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