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It still confuses me! I need A Linux Hug...
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  1. #11
    Just Joined!
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    It still confuses me! I need A Linux Hug

  2. #12
    Linux User Kojak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    421
    Okay, in detail:
    Open a terminal (little black monitor icon), log in as root (type "su" and enter password). Now type

    wget -c http://ardownload.adobe.com/pub/adob...0.1-1.i386.rpm

    This will fetch (with the wget utility (=a download manager))the file you want to install from the adobe server.
    Now type:

    rpm -i AdobeReader_enu-7.0.1-1.i386.rpm

    for installing the downloaded file on your box.

    rm -f AdobeReader_enu-7.0.1-1.i386.rpm

    will clean up the system once the rpm got installed. Now you will need to edit a file with an editor for Adobe to run on your box. Thus type:

    kwrite /usr/share/applications/AdobeReader.desktop

    which will open the file AdobeReader.desktop that is stored in the foldertree /usr/share/applications (=similar to Windows C:\Programs\shared\adobe) with an editor, in this case kwrite. You can use any other editor, too, like gedit, pico, vim, emacs or whatever you have installed. Kwrite should be there by default. Now, once the file is open, you need to scroll to the line that says:

    Categories=Application;Office;Viewer;X-Red-Hat-Base;

    and edit it, so it reads:

    Categories=X-Mandrakelinux-Office-Publishing;

    Now save the file and exit. Adobe should work now. Alternative PDF readers can be installed more easily. Just type in the terminal as root

    urpmi evince

    for installing evince or type:

    urpmi kpdf

    for installing.. you guessed it: kpdf.

    Hope that is detailed enough.

    PS: When you type things, be aware that Linux is case sensitive. "D" is not "d". When you type e.g. a system-path in the terminal, you can autocomplete the next path-section by hitting the TAB key. E.g. you type "kwrite /usr/sha" and hit TAB, it will auto-complete to /usr/share/. Hitting the TAB twice will show you all files/directories that you could type in (= shows file-tree structure).
    Windows free since 2002 | computing since 1984

  3. #13
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    Holy MOLY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


    Well I guess I need a book!!!!

    Do you think Linux for Dummies is the best way to go?

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  5. #14
    Linux User Kojak's Avatar
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    Apr 2006
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    421
    It ain't that hard. Really. Your reaction is only the way it is, because you are unfamiliar with the system. Sure, it will need some time to learn things, but I have never seen a newcomer to linux that was incapable of learning how things are done in Linux. Be a bit patient and don't be afraid. And the use of the terminal is in 99% of cases not mandatory or needed on Mandriva, but sometimes, you can do things faster and more easily with the terminal. For installing software, either use the Mandriva Control Center (MCC/"Configure your computer") or: the terminal. The teminal is faster, but less intuitive. But - as I said - you will learn all that, step by step.

    The chance that you accidently trash your system is not very high, as you need to know the special commands and root privileges in order to kill your system. So don't be afraid of the command line. It won't bite you.

    Linux for dummies is an okay option, but I would start with this guide
    http://doc.mandrivalinux.com/Mandrak.../Starter.html/

    You can also grab it as pdf here: http://doc.mandrivalinux.com/Mandrak...en/Starter.pdf

    And whenever you are unsure what to do / how to proceed, just ask us. We were all once new to Linux and "idiots".

    Additional note: There are internet messangers like Gaim and Xchat available for Linux (install them with "urpmi gaim" or "urpmi xchat" if they aren't there yet). With those messangers, you can connect to the freenode irc channels, where you can get live-help from others who are online. The Mandriva help channels are #musb and #mandriva. If you need help setting up Gaim or Xchat, post a new topic and we will guide you through the process.
    Windows free since 2002 | computing since 1984

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