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Linux is my seasonal hobby, I just go back to Linux, I wonder why Mandriva and Kubuntu lock the root gui login. Also now they lock the CD/DVD burn access, ...
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  1. #1
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    Tips for How to login as root in Mandriva One 2007 using kde graphic user interface


    Linux is my seasonal hobby, I just go back to Linux,
    I wonder why Mandriva and Kubuntu lock the root gui login.
    Also now they lock the CD/DVD burn access, it said root access previllage.
    It must be for security reason, but really pain in the ass for newbie like me who don't want to know any text based command.
    Text based command is only for developer or for people loves it.
    Common people is now much more easy to learn with graphic user interface.
    I just feel Linux become more hard to handle for newbie like me.

    How to login as root in Mandriva One 2007 using kde graphic user interface?

    I gather some tips as follows:

    1. login as usual with your user name
    2. open terminal/console, type: su - root
    3. enter your root password
    4. at root@localhost then type : kdesu konqueror
    5. type in location as follow /etc/kde/kdm
    6. Double click the file : kdmrc
    7. Locate text : AllowRootLogin=false
    8. Change false to true
    9. Save.

    To test:
    Switch user > Start New Session
    type root and the password

    whoola!
    login as root in gui format!

    Use with your own risk!
    Handle with extreme care!


    -----------------------------------------------------------------------



    Note:
    Keep in mind Linux developer : not everyone is geek and have patience!
    Build Linux with very easy way to understand and easy way to use!
    Don't make people think! And don't make too much root based security freak!

    I love Linux and the way it grows, I always put my position with the eye and the mind of very newbie.

    I left Linux two years ago and now still no progress with the ease and human factor.
    I still can't burn my CD/DVD, crap!
    Just simply back to OSX....

  2. #2
    Linux Guru smolloy's Avatar
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    This is a good tutorial, but I think it is very important to mention that doing this is a very bad idea. The reason linux is so secure against viruses is that it does not run as root the entire time, so any nasties only get the permissions of the regular user -- in other words, they can do very little harm to the operating system. In windows, where you run as root all the time, viruses can kill the entire installation.

    In my opinion there is no good reason to log in graphically as root.
    1/ What is the point of taking the risk, since you have to have root priviledges so rarely?
    2/ You expose yourself to making a simple, dumb, mistake that will cripple your system -- this is only possible as root.
    3/ You are exposing your computer to online vulnerabilities.

    We don't advise against running as root because we want to show off our hacking skills. We advise against it to protect newbies from causing their system harm.

    When you need to be root, it is easier to either use "su", or, if you'd prefer a gui, "kdesu".

    Really people. This is a bad idea. It's your computer, so please do as you please. But don't say you weren't warned.

    To the original poster -- if you need to be root to burn a CD/DVD, then there is something misconfigured in your system. Post the details here to see if we can help. Don't try to make linux be like windows or OSX -- all three are different and we prefer it that way.
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    smolloy,

    Quote Originally Posted by smolloy
    To the original poster -- if you need to be root to burn a CD/DVD, then there is something misconfigured in your system. Post the details here to see if we can help.

    Ok then, I use K3b for burn my DVD, but it always error message:
    mkisofs has failed 255
    warning at exit : (1)
    most likely mkisofs failed in some way.

    I've search through this forum but nothing clear explain step-by-step.
    some one said he can change simply all /dev/ permissions, but still not working.

    I couldn't find it how......?


    ------------------------

    Quote Originally Posted by smolloy
    Don't try to make linux be like windows or OSX -- all three are different and we prefer it that way.
    No body want that too! I personally don't like windows, But "we" as a common user still not easy using linux..

    I saw ubuntu built in video that shows the real meanings of "ubuntu" words: "humanity to others". It really touch me.
    From that meaning, I just feel if linux more easy to use, a lot of people will use it.

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    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Hi

    Smolloy is right imo, please don't log into your gui as root for security reasons. On the other hand, we're all grown ups and it's your computer!

    K3b is really just a well designed front end for some command line tools. The package called mkisofs is one of these tools. Do you have it installed? To check this, start K3b, and from the menu go to Settings > Configure K3b > Programs

    Does everything have a tick against it? If mkisofs is missing that would explain the error.

    Notice that in the same menu there's the option to 'Configure K3b'. This requires root access. Use this to see if it helps. If you're not sure about mkisofs, go to a terminal and type man mkisofs ... If it's installed, there will be a manual.

    Even better, type whereis mkisofs. Output might look like this:
    Code:
    mkisofs: /usr/bin/mkisofs /usr/share/man/man8/mkisofs.8.bz2
    Note that this tells you where the software actually is.

    Once it's working K3b is excellent. A few years ago it was full of bugs and I stopped using it ... Now it's well worth the effort.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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    What a great opportunity to debate logging in and running as root.

    Everywhere I read "Don't do it", but it is built right into the operating system to do so.

    I believe that like most that there are very real reasons no to do this, such as a commercial server, but on the other hand an experienced Linux user or a virgin user may indeed want and need to run as root.

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    Lightbulb Tips for mkisofs error 255 in K3b on kde Mandriva One 2007 / Kubuntu 6.10

    First time using K3b burning software on kde Mandriva One 2007 / Kubuntu 6.10,
    When burn CD/DVD, sometimes will occur error message:


    mkisofs has failed 255
    warning at exit : (1)
    most likely mkisofs failed in some way


    It simply error.
    So step-by-step guide to solve will be as follows:

    1. Open K3b
    2. Under menu Setting>Configure K3b>Programs
    3. Check mkisofs, if there's green checked mark, then it already installed.
    4. Check the path, it usually : /usr/bin/mkisofs
    5. Still in Programs, go to tab: User Parameter.
    6. Select the mkisofs, double click the parameter, then type: /usr/bin/mkisofs
    7. Press Apply button

    To test, simply put your blank DVD, drag files to burn them, then burn with K3b default setting.
    It work for me.

    Hope this will ease you.

    -----------------------------
    Note:
    Fingal, thanks for the infos.

    maclinwin, debate about root is not solving my problem.
    But root is root, you know the power of grass root

  8. #7
    Linux Guru smolloy's Avatar
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    lutvision -- I'm glad to hear you got K3B working!


    Quote Originally Posted by maclinwin
    Everywhere I read "Don't do it", but it is built right into the operating system to do so.
    "rm -rf /" is built right into the operating system, and that wouldn't be a smart thing to do, would it? Just cos you can doesn't mean you should.
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    "rm -rf /" is built right into the operating system, and that wouldn't be a smart thing to do, would it? Just cos you can doesn't mean you should.[/QUOTE]

    ,...as is "sudo rm -rf /" from a lesser account.

    My point is that someone that is new to an OS, is trying to really learn the OS, and has figured out how to get it installed it on a spare box, is also capable of installing it a second, third, or more times if they blow it away.

    Not everyone has an infinitely patient, willing SA to show them the ropes.

    A Technology Coordinator from a school was all excited that his got Umbutu installed on a new box. He ask, "what do I do now"?

  10. #9
    Linux Guru Juan Pablo's Avatar
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    ...as is "sudo rm -rf /" from a lesser account.
    First: sudo only works out of the box in Ubuntu (and some other distros, like SuSE with the root password)
    Second: it asks for a password before doing anything
    Third: it makes you think before inputing your password, there's a reason why you need to use sudo to use this particular command

    It's a lot safer

    My point is that someone that is new to an OS, is trying to really learn the OS, and has figured out how to get it installed it on a spare box, is also capable of installing it a second, third, or more times if they blow it away
    But most people doesn't have backups ... and yourself said that not eveerybody have infinete patience to install it over and over again.

    We WON'T create a Windows copy just to atract more users,
    Linux and Windows are TOO different, we are not creating an open source version of Windows.
    Not everyone has an infinitely patient, willing SA to show them the ropes.
    You need patience if you want to try something new


    A Technology Coordinator from a school was all excited that his got Umbutu installed on a new box. He ask, "what do I do now"?
    Start installing with dpkg, apt; encoding videos with mencoder, reading source code, recompiling your kernel, fix it until it breaks and fix it again , install new desktop enviromments, get a tux tattoo on your leg, write some software and compile it for free and release it under the GPL .
    Put your hand in an oven for a minute and it will be like an hour, sit beside a beautiful woman for an hour and it will be like a minute, that is relativity. --Albert Einstein
    Linux User #425940

    Don't PM me with questions, instead post in the forums

  11. #10
    Linux Guru smolloy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maclinwin
    "rm -rf /" is built right into the operating system, and that wouldn't be a smart thing to do, would it? Just cos you can doesn't mean you should.
    ,...as is "sudo rm -rf /" from a lesser account.[/QUOTE]You misunderstood my point. You were arguing that, since it was built into the OS to log in as root, people should do it. I was pointing out that there are several things built into the OS that you shouldn't do.

    Quote Originally Posted by maclinwin
    My point is that someone that is new to an OS, is trying to really learn the OS, and has figured out how to get it installed it on a spare box, is also capable of installing it a second, third, or more times if they blow it away.
    But what about people who will lose a lot of data when they "blow it away". Remember linux is not just a hobby OS; some people use it as their main system, and so cannot afford to kill it by doing something dumb.

    Quote Originally Posted by maclinwin
    Not everyone has an infinitely patient, willing SA to show them the ropes.
    Just because some people are not able or willing to learn linux, doesn't mean that we should make it look like windows. If you are more comfortable using windows, then I advise you to stick with windows. You may do as you please, but I am firmly of the opinion that it is a bad idea to log in as root. There is simply no need to put your system at risk like that, since there are many many other ways of getting things done.
    Registered Linux user #388328 || Registered LFS user #15880
    AMD 64 X2 4600+ :: 2X1GB DDR2 800 :: GeForce 9400 GT 512MB :: ASUS M2N32 Deluxe :: 4X250GB SATAII
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