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I plan on installing Mandriva 2007 on a second hard drive, and was just wondering what filesystem Mandriva uses.......
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie uninvisible's Avatar
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    Filesystem for Mandriva


    I plan on installing Mandriva 2007 on a second hard drive, and was just wondering what filesystem Mandriva uses....
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  2. #2
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
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    It uses whatever filesystem you choose during installation. Most people opt for reiserfs or ext3.

  3. #3
    Linux User netstrider's Avatar
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    As far as I know you can use ext2, ext3, xfs or reiserfs... I might be wrong though.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by netstrider
    As far as I know you can use ext2, ext3, xfs or reiserfs... I might be wrong though.
    That's right as far as I know. I believe reiserfs can accept hard re-boots more easily.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

  5. #5
    Linux User netstrider's Avatar
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    When I use ReiserFS on SuSE my sound keeps setting itself to 30% after each song I play and after each reboot. I have absolutely no idea why, I installed it on ext3 and no problems...With PC-BSD it created the weirdest boot manager, dunno whether it was LILO or what but it showed:

    1. Unix ???
    2. Unix ???
    3. Unix ???
    4. Unix ???
    5. Microsoft Windows

    I don't know whether this should be like it or whether it's an internal problem with the boot manager or is it just ReiserFS, also when I installed PC-BSD on reiser ( i had to because i had no choice), my Windows partition didn't work... So my experience with it has been bad but I've never heard anything bad. I could be wrong, it might be a silly user-related mistake I made which caused these problems. However the SuSE thing above I have tried several times..

  6. #6
    Linux Newbie uninvisible's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replies!! I wondered if you could in fact choose during the install process. The reason i wanted to know was because i want it directly accessible to my SuSE hard drive and vice versa. I assume you can write to both hard drives in linux??
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  7. #7
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uninvisible
    I assume you can write to both hard drives in linux??
    You certainly can.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

  8. #8
    Linux User netstrider's Avatar
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    I was assuming that too, however I can't write to both...I can access but that's it. How do I go about accessing both ?

  9. #9
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Personally I have no experience with dual booting Linux with Windows or BSD. Where I have done it (with other Unices) I've ensured that all the distros involved had the same file systems. I just assumed that would be easier ...

    When you boot up, the Linux kernel will recognise your hard drives. From what I can remember (I only single boot these days) you just need to add some details to /etc/fstab regarding the disks you want to mount and their file systems.

    From then on, it was just a case of adding an icon to your desktop and mounting it ... or rigging it up to automount at boot time.

    Actually I think multi-booting is a huge pain. You just have more data to potentially lose, but that's just my point of view.

    Potentially there are problems because support for any given file system has to be compiled into your kernel, or supported natively. Then you have to understand all the options for your boot loader, then edit fstab.

    Good luck with this.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

  10. #10
    Linux User netstrider's Avatar
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    Both use ext3. Anyway I will single boot in due time after I've played around with some distros. My favorite till now is between Ubuntu and PCLinuxOS...I'm just a new guy still scouting for my perfect distro out there

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