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I also strongly recommend that you do not log in as root. If kdesu doesn't help you, try su (from konsole) and then mount your external drive. Once mounted, try ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Arizona
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    139

    I had these problems a few years ago, I think this is how i fixed it.


    I also strongly recommend that you do not log in as root.

    If kdesu doesn't help you, try su (from konsole) and then mount your external drive. Once mounted, try chown. If you change the ownership of /dev/sda1 to your userid, you should be able to do everything you need.

    I don't see your /dev/sda1 in the fstab. Was your 300G dirve mounted when you posted? How about posting your mtab?

    Also, what is the file system on your external drive? Is it NTFS? Older kernels have problems with writing to NTFS formatted drives and partitions and I think that ntfs is mounted as read-only by default to protect your XP system drive.

    As root, from Konsole, type "kate /etc/mtab"
    add the following line:

    /dev/sda1 /mnt/300GUSB vfat rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev,noatime,uid=500,utf8,shortn ame=lower 0 0

    Of course, you will need to modify the "sda1" to represent your device number, you "300GUSB" will need to reflect whichever folder your drive is mounted to, and "vfat" will need to be correct. (ntfs or try "auto") and as far as the permissions goes, it depends on what you need. "rw" is necessary, then the rest should really only be modified as necessary. It might be easier of you pop in a vfat (fat32, fat16) thumb drive and let it write to mtab before you do this so you can copy and paste.



    If this neither of these work or you still insist upon loggin in as root:

    press ctrl+alt+backspace to kill the xserver.
    type "exit" to log out.
    Then login as root and type "startx kde" (specify kde just in case its not the default and if you want kde)
    When you are done with your administrative tasks, make sure that you change ownership to your user.

  2. #12
    Just Joined!
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    Jan 2007
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    16
    o.k. I'll give that a shot

  3. #13
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Arizona
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    139
    Well, there may be another problem that I was unaware of until last night. I was trying to copy files from XP onto a 4GB thumb drive while in several different live-boot environments. (That would be stealing data if I didn't have that user's permission to do it...) With those few live distros that let me write to the drive, I kept getting an error saying that there wasn't enough space left. I know for sure that this wasn't the case. I had over two gigs left. I figure that there must be some buggy support for 'large' USB devices as well. If you can only write a limited amount of data, perhaps your kernel can only recognize a (first) portion of the memory available. I think that this was my case.

    Instead, I used the new Puppy to write it to DVD with an external burner and I go my data nice and cleanly.

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