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Just installed Mandriva Free 2007 and have the same problem. All I get is the option to end the current session, no restart or shutdown in the session window. I ...
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  1. #1
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    Just installed Mandriva Free 2007 and have the same problem. All I get is the option to end the current session, no restart or shutdown in the session window. I don't think I should have to shutdown by typing a command. I want the graphical interface to work. Still no solution for the problem? Any tips or things to check? Not using 3d desktop.

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    I tried "shutdown -h now", works fine. But as I said sure would be nice to do it graphically.
    Note:
    Guess the mods seperated the threads, but I was replying to this one-
    http://www.linuxforums.org/forum/man...n-problem.html

  3. #3
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Hi - I think I know the answer to this one. You need to go to the Mandriva Control Centre (Configure my Computer) and select a different display manager under System>Choose the display manager ...

    You need to select KDM or the Mandriva version of this. That should give you the menu options you need when you log out. It's kind of annoying to have to type shutdown -n or whatever it is.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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    Only option listed is XDM (X Display Manager).

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    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kadiddlehopper
    Only option listed is XDM (X Display Manager).
    You need to install KDM. I don't know why it's missing: maybe you could use urpmi kdm?
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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    its fixed

    this worked like a charm for me, i can cross this irratation off my list thanks fingal

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    Thanks, was thinking of doing a re-install, but I'll give your suggestion a try tonight.

  8. #8
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by porsher_puddles
    this worked like a charm for me, i can cross this irratation off my list thanks fingal
    Great stuff! Actually I had the same problem a couple of years ago, so that's how I know the answer.
    Quote Originally Posted by kadiddlehopper
    Thanks, was thinking of doing a re-install, but I'll give your suggestion a try tonight.
    You shouldn't need to do that. You already have a working desktop (even if it's a bit irritating at the moment!). You just need to master your package management system.

    You can use Mandriva's gui package system which you'll find lurking in your desktop menu. I've just got used to using a terminal because (I would argue) I have more idea about what's going on from there. A quick overview:

    su <log in as root with your password.>
    urpmi packageName <for installing.>
    urpme packageName <for uninstalling.>
    urpmq packageName <for querying packages.>

    If you haven't already done so, try to set some software repositories up. You can download 90% of what you need that way, and save yourself a lot of lost hours. Visit this site for a quick guide.

    If that doesn't work, don't despair. Most problems can be fixed once you've got your distro installed. If you try to start from scratch, you might end up with more problems than you began with.

    Edit: if you can't find a package called kdm, try mdkkdm and / or kdebase-kdm
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by fingal
    If you haven't already done so, try to set some software repositories up. You can download 90% of what you need that way, and save yourself a lot of lost hours. Visit this site for a quick guide.

    If that doesn't work, don't despair. Most problems can be fixed once you've got your distro installed. If you try to start from scratch, you might end up with more problems than you began with.

    Edit: if you can't find a package called kdm, try mdkkdm and / or kdebase-kdm
    Already used urpmi to set up the repositories and to update.
    Then tried the above and got this=

    [root@localhost chasb]# urpmi kdm
    The package(s) are already installed
    The following package names were assumed: mandriva-kdm-config
    [root@localhost chasb]# urpmi kdebase-kdm
    no package named kdebase-kdm
    [root@localhost chasb]# urpmi mdkkdm
    no package named mdkkdm

    So I'm still open to suggestions.

    Also as a side note, everthing is checked to save sessions when shuting down, but it doesn't save my last session. (ie - running boinc and want it to start up next time I boot).

    ps. running x86_64 amd

  10. #10
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    Hmmm ... I'm reasonably sure kdebase-kdm is what you need. Not sure which repository that would be in though. As for boinc, I run that too. In your /etc directory is a file called rc.local. You could try the following; you need to edit that file as root and add a line to the bottom:

    su
    <password>
    cd /etc

    [This bit depends on how you want to edit that file, so this is very generic.]

    kwrite rc.local (or edit with vim, vi, emacs, pico, kate, joe .... etc.)

    Then add something like:

    /home/kadiddle/tmp/boincdirectory/./run_client

    Basically, anything added correctly to rc.local will start up during boot time. This way you can run your own scripts without having to start them manually.
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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