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this looks like Japanese to me hopefully you can help me decipher it! Code: $ grep flags /proc/cpuinfo flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic ...
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  1. #1
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    is my processor 32 or 64 bit?


    this looks like Japanese to me hopefully you can help me decipher it!

    Code:
    $ grep flags /proc/cpuinfo
    flags		: fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe nx lm constant_tsc up pebs bts pni dtes64 monitor ds_cpl tm2 cid cx16 xtpr
    Thank you for your time

  2. #2
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    try /usr/sbin/demidecode | more
    look for Characteristics. It should say 64-bit capable if it is 64 bit.

  3. #3
    Linux Enthusiast Mudgen's Avatar
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    Looks like 64. Help us out with some info about what model computer it is.

  4. #4
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    The "lm" flag means "Long Mode", which means it has 64 bit support.

    From the lack of sse3/ssse3/sse4 I'd say it's probably an older AMD CPU, but that's just a guess.

  5. #5
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    Helps if you spell it right.

    sudo /usr/sbin/dmidecode | more

  6. #6
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    cat /proc/cpuinfo will tell you how many CPU's and exactly what they are, so if it's a 64 bit CPU, the CPU model it reports can be verified by searching on google

  7. #7
    Linux Newbie user-f11's Avatar
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    RE: Is it 32 or 64 bit

    Are you asking about the processor or about the motherboard? The processor could be seen from the Desktop menu. Navigate to <About This Computer> and see there what is the model of the processor.
    What is the linux ditro installed (32 or 64 bit) could be seen from the terminal:
    $ arch
    should show i386, i686, 86x64 or something of the kind.

    64 bit processors have different socket and could not be placed just so on 32 bit motherboards, however some 64 motherboards have 'saved' components (to reduce the price of the end product) and operate as 32 bit.

    In order to be sure what you have take the screwdriver and see the number and the model of the motherboard 'on the spot'.

    Regards

  8. #8
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    Doesn't this command tell you?
    Code:
    grep 'address size' /proc/cpuinfo
    I could be wrong about that, I haven't worked with hardware-level stuff in a long time.

  9. #9
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    RE: the 64 bit computer system

    Hi,
    If you are asking whether you have a 64 bit computer system, the most probable answer is 'No'.
    In order to have a 64 bit computer system you should have 'Royal Straight Flush': 64 bit processor; 64 bit chipset (specialized chips on the motherboard); the RAM should be made of identical chips and extended to a max; 64 bit BIOS; 64 bit Operation System (rather than 'universal' distro); 64 bit device drivers; the APPs have to be enabled to run on 64 bit architecture.
    If you are missing even only one of these - you do not have 'Royal Straight Flush'.
    Regards

  10. #10
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Please post full contents of /proc/cpuinfo. The flags don't tell whether or not your CPU is 64-bit capable. Also, what is the output of the command 'uname -r'?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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