Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 42
Like Tree9Likes
As a Noobie to Linux not to computers. I have this question how to you disable the Authentication/permissions feature in in Linux Mint. I find it as irritating as the ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Jordan Minnesota
    Posts
    29

    Linux/Mint irritant feature


    As a Noobie to Linux not to computers.
    I have this question how to you disable the Authentication/permissions feature in in Linux Mint. I find it as irritating as the UAC feature in W7. Any and all help is greatly appreciated

  2. #2
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Halesowen, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by Super-Sarge View Post
    As a Noobie to Linux not to computers.
    I have this question how to you disable the Authentication/permissions feature in in Linux Mint. I find it as irritating as the UAC feature in W7. Any and all help is greatly appreciated
    Can you be more specific, an example perhaps.
    If you are talking about having to use sudo and supply a password, there are certain functions where you need root access to perform. That is to protect any other user on your system and outside attackers from wilfully or accidentally damaging your system.

    I don't know anything about Windows UAC but if that's its function, good for it.
    If you use the command line and you want to circumvent using sudo all the time.
    "passwd root" (without the quotes)
    Enter a root password as prompted.
    When you have a terminal opened as a user, "su -" and give it the root password and you are root.
    You can then e.g. "apt-get install xyz" instead of "sudo apt-get install xyz" without having to be asked for a password.

  3. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Jordan Minnesota
    Posts
    29
    I opened terminal from the menu and I typed in the command passwd root and I get you may not not view or modify password information for root

    So what next



    Quote Originally Posted by Siddly View Post
    Can you be more specific, an example perhaps.
    If you are talking about having to use sudo and supply a password, there are certain functions where you need root access to perform. That is to protect any other user on your system and outside attackers from wilfully or accidentally damaging your system.




    I don't know anything about Windows UAC but if that's its function, good for it.
    If you use the command line and you want to circumvent using sudo all the time. I am getting very frustrated with this OS, it may and is quicker than windows but is not as user friendly as Windows 7 64 bit
    "passwd root" (without the quotes)
    Enter a root password as prompted.
    When you have a terminal opened as a user, "su -" and give it the root password and you are root.
    You can then e.g. "apt-get install xyz" instead of "sudo apt-get install xyz" without having to be asked for a password.

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Mason Texas
    Posts
    934
    Are you referring to the logon screen?
    Registered Linux user #526930

  5. #5
    Just Joined! bravobih's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    3

    Linux/Mint irritant feature

    Quote Originally Posted by Super-Sarge View Post
    I opened terminal from the menu and I typed in the command passwd root and I get you may not not view or modify password information for root

    So what next
    You have to execute "sudo passwd root" to insert the root password.

  6. #6
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    5,023
    The only way to completely turn off any need for authentication would be to login to the GUI as root. Which is a very bad idea.

    It's also disabled in Mint, by default.
    Jay

    New users, read this first.
    New Member FAQ
    Registered Linux User #463940
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help. Please keep it on the public boards.

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Jordan Minnesota
    Posts
    29
    Quote Originally Posted by MASONTX View Post
    Are you referring to the logon screen?
    No I am referring to the fact That when I want to do certain things it asks for password to authenticate before I can take that action, I find this frustrating and wish to disable this function of Linux Mint. In Windows 7 they have have the something it is Called UAC but can be turned off as an option.

    I am the only user of this computer I do not need to be protected from myself

  8. #8
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Desert
    Posts
    4,110
    Linux Newbie Administrator Guide - Home

    You may be the only one using your computer. But Control can be taken away on the net by crackers with root access.
    Linux Registered User # 475019
    Lead,Follow, or get the heck out of the way. I Have a Masters in Raising Hell
    Tech Books
    Free Linux Books
    Newbie Guide
    Courses at Home

  9. #9
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    5,023
    You would also be able to make mistakes, as root, that could break the system .
    Being logged in as a regular user protects you from this.
    Jay

    New users, read this first.
    New Member FAQ
    Registered Linux User #463940
    I do not respond to private messages asking for Linux help. Please keep it on the public boards.

  10. #10
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Halesowen, West Midlands, UK
    Posts
    107
    Quote Originally Posted by Super-Sarge View Post
    No I am referring to the fact That when I want to do certain things it asks for password to authenticate before I can take that action, I find this frustrating and wish to disable this function of Linux Mint. In Windows 7 they have have the something it is Called UAC but can be turned off as an option.

    I am the only user of this computer I do not need to be protected from myself
    OK, it's "sudo passwd root".
    I foresaw that coming, that's why I also mentioned vulnerability to outside attacks. I've seen many guys saying exactly that. OK, if you go on the internet with that PC you are not the only user if you are unprotected.

    In the Unix world security has always been paramount and even more so in the Mainframe world. It's not an add-on as in Windows, it's an integral part of the Linux system and every OS barring one I've used over the last 41 years.
    May be it's possible to delve into some file and turn it off thereby giving root access to the world.

    Here we don't tolerate the get hacked, reinstall methods. Welcome to the grown up world of computing.

Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 4 5 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •