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Hello. Earlier today I tried to install LinuxMint(I'm very new at this, it's the second time I'm installing a Linux distro and the other one was Ubuntu via Windows Installer). ...
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  1. #1
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    Partitioning problem


    Hello.
    Earlier today I tried to install LinuxMint(I'm very new at this, it's the second time I'm installing a Linux distro and the other one was Ubuntu via Windows Installer). I wanted to make a separate partition for it but I couldn't because I already have 4 partitions(one with windows, one with data and 2 with recovery stuff-this is how I got my laptop). I tried to install it on D: (the data one) but I ended up losing all my stuff. Now I have 367 GB of unpartitioned space and I want to install LinuxMint on 100gb and leave the rest for files on Windows. Is there any way I can do this or am I doomed? Also, if there is a way, I need step-by-step instructions being a beginner in this stuff.

    I'll attach photos with my 2 other partitions(the recovery ones): HTRMs.jpg

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Administrator jayd512's Avatar
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    Hello and Welcome!

    Sorry to hear that you lost your data. Did you happen to backup your files before attempting the install?
    To shed a little light, though, hard drives typically have a limit of 4 primary partitions. Can't have any more than that. You can, however, create an Extended partition (looks like you have one now). Inside that Extended partition, you can create any number of Logical partitions.
    Those Logical partitions will do quite nicely as a target location for a Linux installer.

    So, there are a couple of simple methods for this.
    1. Use something like PartedMagic to prepare your partitions ahead of time.
    2. Use the partitioning tool included in the Linux installer to prepare them.

    Either method will work, though I personally prefer to prepare them ahead of time using PartedMagic.
    Once you have partitions setup to your liking, boot your computer with the installation media, and point the installer to your new partition, and follow the instructions to install Linux alongside Windows.
    Jay

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