Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 9 of 9
I run Mint 13 and tried to add a new screen resolution by using sudo X -configure to create an Xorg.conf.new file in the home folder, changing the name to ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    16

    Edited Xorg.conf & unable to boot


    I run Mint 13 and tried to add a new screen resolution by using sudo X -configure to create an Xorg.conf.new file in the home folder, changing the name to xorg.conf, add the new screen resolution and then move the file by using sudo cp xorg.conf/etc/X11.

    After this I was unable to boot into the laptop.
    My mistake was that the xorg.conf file was read only and I did a save as Xorg 1.conf, updated that and then ran cp xorg.conf/etc/X11.

    When I boot up using a USB stick I can see the X11 folders on both the original Mint version from the USB drive and the corrupted file in the X11 folder.

    I see in the original Mint version that there is no Xorg.conf file so I wonder if I can delete the corrupt file and the system might boot up again. However, I cannot see how to either delete the xorg.conf file or replace it with a non corrupted version. I have tried unsuccessfuly to delete the Xorg.conf file but I do not have the rights to make any changes.

    Can anyone help me with the commands to either update or delete the corrupt xorg.conf file?

    Any help would be very much appreciated.

  2. #2
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,638
    Are you saying that you overwrote the X11 folder or that you have a broken xorg.conf file in the X11 folder? If the later then simply renaming (or deleting) the xorg.conf file should get your system working.
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



    The Fifth Continent

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    16
    I have broken the xorg.conf file the X11 folder is OK. I think if I could delete it the sytem would boot up. However, it will not allow me to delete it or rename it.

  4. $spacer_open
    $spacer_close
  5. #4
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,638
    Boot from the hard disk and when it finishes booting, presumably at a black screen, press Ctrl + Alt + F2. Log in as yourself and you should be at a terminal. Run the following:
    Code:
    cd /etc/X11
    sudo mv xorg.conf xorg.broken
    sudo shutdown -r now
    The second, and possible third commands will ask for your password but nothing will appear to happen when you type it in. The last command there reboots. I chose to move the conf file to leave it around in case you want to try fixing it.
    Last edited by elija; 04-04-2013 at 09:30 AM. Reason: Fix code tags. Added more
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



    The Fifth Continent

  6. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    16
    When I start from the hard drive it comes up with "failed to start the X server" and asks if I want to diagnose the problem. When I say yes it comes up to say problem parsing the config file & no screens found. I cannot get any further than that using the normal boot.

    I can boot up from the USB drive and access the Mint files. I can see the xorg.config file I need to delete or amend and I can also open a terminal.

    Would it be safe to run those commands as you describe above when I am running from the usb drive?

  7. #6
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,638
    What happens if you answer no? does it drop you to a shell? If so you should be able to run the commands from there.

    It should be safe to run them from the usb drive but the paths would be different to what I posted.
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



    The Fifth Continent

  8. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    16
    I tried the script when I was running from the usb drive but I was not sure how to mofify the script and it came up with the following.

    mint@mint ~ $ cd /etc/X11
    mint@mint /etc/X11 $ sudo mv xorg.conf xorg.broken
    mv: cannot stat `xorg.conf': No such file or directory
    mint@mint /etc/X11 $

    Somehow I need to point it to the Mint system but I am afraid I am not up to modifying the commands myself. I would reallly appreciate it if you could tell me how to make the changes.

    Many thanks.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #8
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,638
    When you open the folder in the file manager, you should be able to right click and select "Open in Terminal". From there you can use the last two commands. Or you can just reboot normally as you are in a GUI anyway.
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



    The Fifth Continent

  10. #9
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    16
    Yes, it worked! Many many thanks. This was actually my daughters laptop that I was working with to add a new resolution and I had visions of losing all her uni work.

    Much appreciated.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •