Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
Hello all I want to write the mint ISO file to a usb drive and on the site they said to come here to find out how to do that. ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Staten Island, New York
    Posts
    103

    write mint iso to usb drive


    Hello all
    I want to write the mint ISO file to a usb drive and on the site they said to come here to find out how to do that. Could some one give me instructions on how to do that? Please make the directions easy as I'm new to linux operating systems.
    Thank you all in advance for your help.
    Montana

  2. #2
    Linux Guru rokytnji's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Desert
    Posts
    4,043
    Quote Originally Posted by Montana68 View Post
    Hello all
    I want to write the mint ISO file to a usb drive and on the site they said to come here to find out how to do that. Could some one give me instructions on how to do that? Please make the directions easy as I'm new to linux operating systems.
    Thank you all in advance for your help.
    Montana
    Uh. What site? Link?

    Anyhows, what operating system do you have to make a bootable usb? In other words. What are you running?
    Linux Registered User # 475019
    Lead,Follow, or get the heck out of the way. I Have a Masters in Raising Hell
    Tech Books
    Free Linux Books
    Newbie Guide
    Courses at Home

  3. #3
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    3,190
    There are a number of ways to do it and one of the more common ways is using a program called unetbootin which has different versions for Linux and windows.
    More information as requested above would enable someone to give you more detailed instructions.

  4. #4
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Staten Island, New York
    Posts
    103
    Hello All
    I'm getting mint from a mirror on mint site.
    Using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.
    Thank you for your help.
    Montana

  5. #5
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    35

    Cool Installing an OS in a usb drive.

    Quote Originally Posted by Montana68 View Post
    Hello All
    I'm getting mint from a mirror on mint site.
    Using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.
    Thank you for your help.
    Montana
    The way that I've always done it is to simply download the ISO file to a hard drive. I then burn the ISO file to a DVD. Then I run the DVD, which starts up the installation software. I've used this for Linux. I make sure that the data is going to the USB drive, and nowhere else. When towards the end, you will be asked on your screen where do you want to install the Grub boot manager. I make sure that it gets installed on the Linux MBR, and not on the Windows MBR. The boot manager will check out your system to see what you have installed there. With that information, it will make up a menu for you to choose which operating system you want to start up. It may be Windows, or Linux.

    Go into your bios. Make sure that the order of preference for the system to start up a drive is setup. I always choose USB, CDROM, then computer hard drive. If you do that correctly, everytime you start up your computer, it will give you a choice of what you want to run from the Grub menu.

    Placing the Grub bootloader, in the Linux drive, keeps your system intact without any problems. As long as the memory stick is plugged into the USB port, it will be the first one to be selected. If you unplug the USB stick, then you will NOT see the Grub bootloader. You will only see your Windows loading up as if nothing is ever changed. This way, no mistakes are made by corrupting or losing space on your internal hard drive. If you lose Windows, and or your internal hard drive, you sitll have Linux to work with (this happened to me a few weeks ago. I used Linux to fix Windows).

    I am currently use a USB hard drive with Linux in it. Same principle as a memory stick, except for the large storage capability. I'm using it right now to write this. Works pretty well!

    Hope this helps.

  6. #6
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    11
    If, like me, you try Unetbootin from Windows and get an error msg "not a win32 program" or something similar, try a program called Rufus. It's free, open source, and quick. I've had some problems with versions of it on certain ISO's, but I have successfully used it for Mint Cinnamon recently. I used the latest beta.

    Don't have enough posts for a link, but Google "Rufus" and it's now the first hit.

  7. #7
    Linux Newbie jkwilborn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    236
    I've checked into this and my chat with others is that I've learned that it's easier than I thought. This has worked many times for me. I picked up a USB memory stick, and just used dd to copy it to the device. I've used this with Debian for my PC type computer and also for a plug computer that is also running Debian. The plug requires a vfat and ext2. For fun, I took a new stick and just dd'd it across. My plug booted and ran off this with no other problems. When I looked at that USB stick with gparted I saw that it had created the proper partitions.

    I also noted that I write the output file to the device, not the partition, like if you have it mounted as /dev/sde1. Write to /dev/sde. No partition specification. I would do the following...

    Code:
    dd if=whatever.iso of=/dev/sde bs=1M
    if it's very big use a larger bs (block size). From what I understand the write from dd will build the proper structures on the USB sick. Seems too simple but it has worked for me on two different machine with USB sicks purchased new with just the dd to copy the iso image over.

    My understanding of this is that the iso is a bitmap of the actual information in the proper format and dd does a bit for bit copy, therefor creating all the proper data structures during the copy. I didn't think it could be so simple, but I tried it and found it to work wonderfully. Since formatting is just building the proper structures, it appears that dd will do that. Give it a shot and keep in touch...

    Try it and let us all know....

    Jack
    Last edited by jkwilborn; 07-16-2013 at 02:14 PM. Reason: add some clarifications

  8. #8
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Staten Island, New York
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by jkwilborn View Post
    I've checked into this and my chat with others is that I've learned that it's easier than I thought. This has worked many times for me. I picked up a USB memory stick, and just used dd to copy it to the device. I've used this with Debian for my PC type computer and also for a plug computer that is also running Debian. The plug requires a vfat and ext2. For fun, I took a new stick and just dd'd it across. My plug booted and ran off this with no other problems. When I looked at that USB stick with gparted I saw that it had created the proper partitions.

    I also noted that I write the output file to the device, not the partition, like if you have it mounted as /dev/sde1. Write to /dev/sde. No partition specification. I would do the following...

    Code:
    dd if=whatever.iso of=/dev/sde bs=1M
    if it's very big use a larger bs (block size). From what I understand the write from dd will build the proper structures on the USB sick. Seems too simple but it has worked for me on two different machine with USB sicks purchased new with just the dd to copy the iso image over.

    My understanding of this is that the iso is a bitmap of the actual information in the proper format and dd does a bit for bit copy, therefor creating all the proper data structures during the copy. I didn't think it could be so simple, but I tried it and found it to work wonderfully. Since formatting is just building the proper structures, it appears that dd will do that. Give it a shot and keep in touch...

    Try it and let us all know....

    Jack




    Hello Jack
    So I just use the command that you show here.

    dd if=whatever.iso of=/dev/sde bs=1M

    I put the name in where it says whatever and then just click enter. This will run the command and install it onto the usb stick.
    Thank you.
    Lou

  9. #9
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    3,190
    The dd method should work with a 'hybrid' iso and any recent Mint iso should be hybrid. Yes, you put the exact name of the iso (it is case sensitive) and you would need to put the correct dev name as it may not be sde. You can find that by using the sudo fdisk -l command in Ubuntu with the flash plugged in.

    As indicated previously, unetbootin does exactly this and you can also create persistence that way.

  10. #10
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    11
    Given that the OP probably needs to create the bootable drive from Windows, is your dd method going to work in Win?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •