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Hello! I'm wanting to try my hand at BFSLinux, and it seems that it's a pretty good idea to use virtual machines... Yeah, that's where I'm lost (perhaps I should ...
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  1. #1
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    Virtual machines


    Hello! I'm wanting to try my hand at BFSLinux, and it seems that it's a pretty good idea to use virtual machines...
    Yeah, that's where I'm lost (perhaps I should put this in the n00b section...). I've looked for something, but VMWare doesn't seem to be free, and the Windows thingy doesn't work with Vista home (BTW --I'm running Vista home premium 32 on a 64 processor... which will be the host for the virtual machine). And nothing else seems to be free/compatible. Could anyone help me out?
    I suppose I could run a virtual machine in a temporary installation of Linux. (I feel smart! not really...). I'll look into that as soon as I can, but if someone would be so kind as to point out some good virtual machines and perhaps even tutorials on using them (I'll probably be able to figure them out, but it wouldn't hurt to read on it anyways), I would be very thankful.
    Well, good night (hopefully... perhaps I should stop posting so late at night).

  2. #2
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    VMWare Server is free.

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    Actually, I saw that, but I thought that was for servers, like to access other computers or something like VLC (sounded stupid for the company, but... yeah. It was the me being stupid, probably).
    Does it offer near-native emulation? I'm wanting to make the OS for this computer, so I hope so... anyways, I should have been asleep a few hours ago. Sorry for posting again.
    Oh, and thank you! Thank you very much --didn't mean to sound unapreciative or anything. I was actually looking forward to using VMware when I "found" that I couldn't, and now it looks like I can again!

  4. #4
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    Hello, I've been looking at VMWare's server thingy, but (besides not wanting to put all of that contact/personal information, which is mostly a lie anyways) as far as I can tell it is actually for servers and businesses... which I am not (ehem). Sorry; it's just that the website intemedated me.... Will this be what I want to use?

    Anyways, all of my discs were lost, so I'm going to have to reburn a new Linux disc (and, for the heck about it, I'm going to try out another distro...). I don't know why I said that.

  5. #5
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    VMWare labels their products based on how the product works. Virtual machines (VM's) running on VMWare Workstation are not powered on unless you log in, start Workstation, and manually start the VM.

    VMWare Server is a set of services that run when the machine is booted, so VM's can start automatically with the OS. You access the Server by using a VMWare console/client. So the naming "server" has nothing to do with who should run it.

    If someone names a product "Software - Super Elite Business Only" would that keep you from running it?

    VMWare only asks for some info when they give you a serial number in order to track who is downloading and how they're using it. (Usual marketing stuff.) I generally put in bogus info - the web page will give you a serial as soon as you hit submit.

    I use Workstation, Server, and ESX - at home and at work. I've had no problems with any X86 OS on any VMWare - which includes lots of Windows OS, SLES, RHEL, Debian, FreeBSD, Ubuntu, and Solaris - both i386 and X86_64 flavors. (Only Solaris on ESX has given me problems - Ugh.)

    But, there are lots of virtualization products - use whatever you like best and be thankful that you have so many options.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by HROAdmin26 View Post
    If someone names a product "Software - Super Elite Business Only" would that keep you from running it?
    Heh, well...
    Honestly, I'm just wary of something wasting my time and resources or screwing my computer up. I've lost all of my data before (at the time 30 GB of music; the ante's up to over 80 now, though). I'm still too nervous about a lot of things, but nowadays I seem more about looking for answers than finding them myself. My sincerest apologies on this matter.
    As for what intimidated me, it wasn't the name so much as the "How many computers are on your network?" question with 500 being the smallest answer... that and similar questions lead me to think that I would be running this to be messing with these hundreds of other computers that I don't have.

    Quote Originally Posted by HROAdmin26 View Post
    But, there are lots of virtualization products - use whatever you like best and be thankful that you have so many options.
    I don't mean to sound ungrateful (Oh, and thank you, by the way --you've been more than helpful ^,^). I'm just suffering --as most people do in such a situation --from a simple question with +dozens of answers.

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    Hey, no problem - I am not trying to tell you what to do/run.

    I think all I can add is:

    A) If you are running "test" stuff, don't run it on the same machine as your "important" data. If you *have* to, make sure you backup the important stuff first - copy it to tape, DVD, another HDD, whatever works. Burning XX DVD's may sounds like a real drag, but you will be grateful you did when something goes wrong.

    B) Accept that if you are learning and running "test" stuff, you will make mistakes. Knowing that, see point A) above.

    C) Learning and playing with test stuff is what keeps this fun. If you run out of things to learn/test, you will probably move on to another hobby. So having choices and trying different virtualization methods is part of the fun.

    D) Read up on virtualization and how it works - that will help you understand how each product works.

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    vmware isn't high performance by any stretch of the imagination. For that kind of performance you'll want OpenVZ.

    You can install that with yum or apt depending on your distribution.

    You can also use Xen, which is like VMWare in terms of performance but still adequate for many purposes. That can also be installed with yum/apt.

    Good luck.

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    Really? As much as I hear about it, I'd imagine it to be pretty high up there, at least...
    But you kinda missed the part about me wanting to use Windows. I could temporarily install Linux onto the machine, but it seems like it would be a bit useless.

  10. #10
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    vmware isn't high performance by any stretch of the imagination. For that kind of performance you'll want OpenVZ.
    And where in this thread was performance even discussed before you brought it up?

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