Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 8 of 8
Hi , I had forgot my root password in SUSE .can anyone help me how to recover the root password in SUSE Naresh...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    4

    Root passwd forgotten


    Hi ,
    I had forgot my root password in SUSE .can anyone help me how to recover the root password in SUSE

    Naresh

  2. #2
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,497
    There is usually an option at boot time to boot to a recovery or
    single user mode. This will give you root access without logging
    in. Then you can reset the password using the command

    passwd root

    (This worked on an Ubuntu server - it should be OK for Suse)
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer valemon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Volos
    Posts
    934
    Welcome to LF paturinaresh

    You can have a look in this thread on how to recover root password.
    Linux is like a Teepee, No Windows, No Gates, Only Apache Inside!
    Arch Linux
    Linux user #442041

  4. #4
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    13
    you might try doing a search for FIRSTBOOT in the /etc/sysconfig folder
    there is a file called firstboot that walks you through the inital setup process.
    just vi the file and change RUN_FIRSTBOOT=NO
    to RUN_FIRSTBOOT=YES

    good luck!

  5. #5
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Córdoba (Spain)
    Posts
    1,513
    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    There is usually an option at boot time to boot to a recovery or
    single user mode. This will give you root access without logging
    in. Then you can reset the password using the command

    passwd root

    (This worked on an Ubuntu server - it should be OK for Suse)
    I am amazed that there are still server oriented distros that do this. This, and having no password for root, is almost the same. Something not admissible for a server oriented distro.

    The correct way to restore your password, if you don't have enabled the single user mode, is to boot from an alternate disk (cdrom, usb, whatever), then chroot, and then use the passwd command to set again the password.

  6. #6
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Either at home or at work or down the pub
    Posts
    3,497
    Quote Originally Posted by i92guboj View Post
    I am amazed that there are still server oriented distros that do this. This, and having no password for root, is almost the same. Something not admissible for a server oriented distro.
    Well, you do have to be at the machine. So if you have physical access to the
    server, I guess the logic is that you have the authority
    What do we want?
    Time machines!

    When do we want 'em?
    Doesn't really matter does it!?


    The Fifth Continent

  7. #7
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Córdoba (Spain)
    Posts
    1,513
    Quote Originally Posted by elija View Post
    Well, you do have to be at the machine. So if you have physical access to the
    server, I guess the logic is that you have the authority
    Of course, if there's physical access then there's no invulnerable machine. But it's not quite the same. Anyone can reset the server in a few seconds and end logged as root. It takes only a few seconds, and that is the main concern. Anyone can do that and drop a rootkit in a very little time, or just add an ssh key or whatever.

    Something that could be easily solved. I suppose it's all about tastes after all.

  8. #8
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    home
    Posts
    796
    I've seen on one distro (can't remember which one, though) where you need root password to boot single user mode. I don't use many distros, so it might be like this on more than the one. In this case, a livecd is required to chroot and set the password. I think you could also pass the parameter init=/bin/sh to the kernel on boot, and it will load a shell instead of init, and you could change password from there, but I don't remember for sure if that works or not.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •