Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Does anyone know of a good commandline distro that's not to large, that works on older computers, and has developing tools like gcc and nasm.? I'd appreciate help finding one ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    15

    Commandline ONLY Distro


    Does anyone know of a good commandline distro that's not to large, that works on older computers, and has developing tools like gcc and nasm.? I'd appreciate help finding one (or more ) Thanks all.!

    PS. If it's possible, are there any good slackware based ones.?

  2. #2
    oz
    oz is offline
    forum.guy
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    arch linux
    Posts
    18,733
    Zenwalk is lightweight and based on Slackware. You can always add any extra tools/utilities that you need.
    oz

  3. #3
    Blackfooted Penguin daark.child's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    West Yorks
    Posts
    4,393
    Any distro can be command line only depending on the packages you install.

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    home
    Posts
    796
    LFS if you have the time and experience, otherwise slack or something like it would likely be good. You might also look at Arch.

  5. #5
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Córdoba (Spain)
    Posts
    1,513
    What you are asking for is, more or less, a Gentoo stage3 without any additional packages.

  6. #6
    Linux User IsaacKuo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA, USA
    Posts
    384
    I'm not familiar with Slackware, but if you want something based on Slackware, what's wrong with Slackware itself?

    From The Slackware Linux Project: Installation Help

    "For example, if you know you don't want the X Window System, just skip all of the X software set."

    Personally, I prefer Debian. So when I want text only install (usually a server of some sort), then I just do a base Debian install. Then, of course, I install whatever software I want to get going.

    You could do the same with Slackware, if you want.
    Isaac Kuo, ICQ 29055726 or Yahoo mechdan

  7. #7
    Linux Guru coopstah13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NH, USA
    Posts
    3,149
    I think debian is a good choice for this, if you do a net install of debian and then only install what you need afterwards, which seems to only be developer tools, you can just add them and you will not have any extra space used for extra junk, i imagine you can get a debian base install + developer tools installed in only 400-500mb disk space

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •