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  1. #1
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    Linux filenames


    I did a strange thing today.

    Code:
    mv myfile.zip mydir#
    Notice the hash symbol after my directory name. It hasn't created a directory, however I can view the contents of the zip file within the 'non directory' by using midnight commander.

    I cant find an explaination(googling) of what the hash does within a linux filename.

    Im using Bash. Can anyone help?

  2. #2
    The hash symbol (or pound sign) has no special meaning in Linux filenames. It's just another character that can be used in filenames like the dash (-) or underscore (_).

  3. #3
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    re:linux filenames

    when I try to cd to the directory I get an error...

    Code:
    bash: cd: mydir#: Not a directory
    I can only open the directory in midnight commander. Why does it have this affect if it has no special meaning within a filename?

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  5. #4
    Administrator MikeTbob's Avatar
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    You basically just renamed myfile.zip to mydir# it never was or is a directory. It's still the same data, you just renamed it. If you want to change it back: mv mydir# myfile.zip
    If you can open it in a file browser, I think what you are seeing is the actual zip files.
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  6. #5
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    re:linux filenames

    Lol!

    Now I see!! I spent a good hour googling that Now I can get on with what I was actually doing!

    Cheers!

  7. #6
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    To be more concrete, '#' might or might not have an special meaning.

    It has nothing to do with this issue, which was purely a confussion. But under some circumstances this character has a special meaning in bash.

    Quote Originally Posted by bash man page
    In a non-interactive shell, or an interactive shell in which the interac‐
    tive_comments option to the shopt builtin is enabled (see SHELL BUILTIN COM‐
    MANDS below), a word beginning with # causes that word and all remaining
    characters on that line to be ignored. An interactive shell without the
    interactive_comments option enabled does not allow comments. The interac‐
    tive_comments option is on by default in interactive shells.

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