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In the past, I have typed in a terminal: chmod 777 filepath and it changed the permissions of all the files and subdirectories. However, I have also learned that the ...
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  1. #1
    Linux User SkittleLinux18's Avatar
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    [SOLVED] Question regarding CHMOD terminal command...


    In the past, I have typed in a terminal:

    chmod 777 filepath
    and it changed the permissions of all the files and subdirectories. However, I have also learned that the only way to change the permissions of all the subdirectories is to type in a terminal:

    chmod --r 777 filepath
    I guess my question is, what's the difference if they both do the same thing?
    Using Linux since June 2007
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  2. #2
    Linux Engineer GNU-Fan's Avatar
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    It shouldn't do that.
    chmod should not recurse unless called with -R (uppercase!).

    If it does, I assume your distributor made a macro called by that name which is mapped to chmod with the recursive option.

    Try to call explicitly /bin/chmod and see if it is any different.
    Debian GNU/Linux -- You know you want it.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer Freston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkittleLinux18
    In the past, I have typed in a terminal:
    Code:
    chmod 777 filepath
    and it changed the permissions of all the files and subdirectories.
    I certainly hope not

    Calling `chmod 777 /path/to/file` should only change permissions on 'file' in '/path/to/' and not anything else. You can make it recursive with the -R option, yes, if that is your intent. But it shouldn't be default. That might just make your entire collection of nature pictures world readable.
    Can't tell an OS by it's GUI

  4. #4
    Linux User SkittleLinux18's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GNU-Fan View Post
    It shouldn't do that.
    chmod should not recurse unless called with -R (uppercase!).

    If it does, I assume your distributor made a macro called by that name which is mapped to chmod with the recursive option.

    Try to call explicitly /bin/chmod and see if it is any different.
    I pulled up the help menu for chmod in the terminal, and --R was definitely listed as an option in there. I must have typed --R in the past and, for some freakish reason, just can't remember. Thanks, guys.
    Using Linux since June 2007
    Distros: Mint 16 KDE
    SPECS: AMD Atholon 64 X2 3.2 Ghz, 4GB RAM, GeForce GTS 250 1GB VRAM
    When your whole life is on one computer, servers and all, choose stability over anything else.

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