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Of course there is a use for reiserfs and xfs, otherwise they wouldn't exist, right? Reiserfs is extremely superior when it comes to fragmentation of small files, since it doesn't ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru
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    Of course there is a use for reiserfs and xfs, otherwise they wouldn't exist, right? Reiserfs is extremely superior when it comes to fragmentation of small files, since it doesn't use block allocation like normal file systems. Therefore small files waste much less space on a reiserfs. I believe that it holds both advantages and disadvantages in speed related to ext3, depending on the size of the files.
    XFS, as far as I know, is faster than ext3, and I don't really know why everyone doesn't use it, but I haven't really read much about it. I know that one of its great advantages is that allows resizing while mounted, unlike ext3.

    If I install a workstation at someones home, I just give them a /boot, root and swap partition. What use would they have of having /home on a seperate partition? I dunno. Myself, I have /home mounted over NFS so that all my computers share it.
    I don't really have much experience of production environments, since I only use Linux at home. All the places I have worked at consistently use Windows. Ugh. But if I were to configure a production environment, I would get a bunch of SCSI drives, and put them in a hardware RAID controller. If it would be a database server, like you say, I'd put the actual database files on disks on their own (preferably even on their own controller card), and, if possible, run several disks in a striped configuration to improve throughput. I would also have a seperate /tmp partition so that it can be mounted with noexec and similar options to improve security. I'd also have the swap space on a seperate disk, if possible. In an extreme production environment I'd probably distribute the swap over several individual disks to improve throughput even more. But I don't really know. There are other people here who have a lot more experience with production environments.

  2. #12
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    /tmp

    My partitions outlined earlier are just the way i have always done it. I followed a detailed (although very old) howto document when I first set up Linux. I like keeping /home separate so I can reformat other partitions as I change distros etc without losing my stuff. The /usr partition I was never really sure about. But it worked so I never changed it.

    What is the /tmp used for and why would you need to tighten up the security?
    No trees were harmed during the creation of this message. Its made from a blend of elephant tusk and dolphin meat.

  3. #13
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    /tmp stands for temporary, and all temporary files are created per default in /tmp. That also means that /tmp is world-writable, and that it has to be for programs to operate properly. That, however, also means that if your system is cracked, the worms can also use /tmp as a staging area for downloading and compiling any back doors or anything that the cracker wants to run on your computer. By mounting /tmp with noexec you effectively thwart that. Although the programs can still be downloaded and compiled, that cannot be executed once they're done. To be safe from other things as well, you can also mount it with nodev and nosuid.

    I do understand your decision to use a seperate partition for your home directories. I haven't really thought of it, but I do agree that it is a good thing. I would have them over LVM as well, though, in case you need to resize them, which might be rather likely.

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