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1st post, so I'd like to say hello to everyone As for the question, I am jsut looking for some recommendations on what Linux or UNIX version would be best ...
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  1. #1
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    Distro decision


    1st post, so I'd like to say hello to everyone

    As for the question, I am jsut looking for some recommendations on what Linux or UNIX version would be best for Python programming. I've been using objective-C for my ipod SDk's but would prefer Python than C.

    I've done some digging around and my best choices at the moment are Debian 5 and Fedora 10 - 11 for Linux and FreeBSD and OpenSolaris for UNIX. I've discovered though, that OpenSolaris has an outdated Python library (2.4) instead of Python 3.0.

    Any other recommendations you guys would give? I have used Linux before (Ubuntu, Fedora and DSL) and I use OS X as my main platform, so am quite familiar with the Terminal etc.

    Many Thanks!

  2. #2
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    You can install what you need in pretty much any distro, so it's mostly up to personal preference. Debian is very stable, but because releases are few and far between, their packages become quickly outdated. If you want more current packages, Ubuntu, Fedora, openSUSE, etc. would probably be better.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    As reed9 mentioned, pretty much all the major distributions of Linux have the same capabilities. The main difference is simply what programs they choose to include in the default install and what desktop themes/colors they use. All Linux distributions will allow you to program in pretty much whatever language you like (although some of the proprietary languages like C# are trickier to get working).

    If you're particular about the version of python that's included, you can check up on versions for popular distributions on their pages with DistroWatch. Generally speaking, the more frequently released distributions tend to have the newest versions of software. Best of luck, and I hope you enjoy the experience.

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