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So I'm trying to find an API or a system call that will let me know if the display is digital or not (byte 20, bit 7 in EDID). Has ...
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    How get info about your display if it is digital or analog?


    So I'm trying to find an API or a system call that will let me know if the display is digital or not (byte 20, bit 7 in EDID). Has anyone tried this? Here's what I've looked at:

    1. xrandr --verbose == tells me a lot about the display, but nothing about digital or not.

    2. read-edid/ parse-edid == what I'm looking for, but requires root privileges. I might be able to dig in there and just try to extract what I need without root.

    3. parse /var/log/Xorg.0.log == spits out the EDID in hex, but not standardized. ATI differs from NV.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Don't know about programmatically, but if you are using a VGA port or DVI->VGA adapter, it is analog, and if a DVI or HDMI port direct to the display, it is digital.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Are there logs (consistent between different graphics cards) or system calls to let us know if it detected the different ports (VGA,DVI,HDMI)?

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Consistent logs? It would be nice!
    I looked at my nvidia installation log in /var/log and found nothing about the display types it found. It did use ACPI to determine the interrupt to use for the card.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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