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Unfortunately, the region-code is stored in the drive itself (probably in eeprom) and has a hard-coded limit as to the number of times the RC can be switched - usually ...
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  1. #11
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, the region-code is stored in the drive itself (probably in eeprom) and has a hard-coded limit as to the number of times the RC can be switched - usually about 5. As you know, Linux libdvdcss can bypass the RC of the drive, I suspect by telling the drive that the media is region 0. As for my own purposes, I always rip an unencoded copy (with RC removed) of all my commercial DVD's and put the iso files on my laptop for travel or playback under Windows - I mount them as a virtual DVD using Alcohol 120%.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  2. #12
    Just Joined! Tarthen's Avatar
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    Making ISO's and using dvd::rip is kinda pointless... I find Handbrake does it very, very well. With libdvdcss installed in a Linux system, it can rip and encode in one step. And dvd::rip always seems to end up in dependency hell for me.

  3. #13
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    Folks, forgive me if I'm a bit dense, but after reading this thread, the sum of the information seems to be that under linux (Ubuntu Jaunty for me), I should be able to rip a region-2 commercial DVD to an ISO file, and burn it into a blank DVD (using something like k3b), producing essentially a region-0 DVD that should play in any "non-PC" DVD player - as long as I have the CSS library installed . Am I reading this thread correctly?

    This is the output of regionset on my system right now:
    Code:
    abc@def:~$ regionset /dev/dvdrw1
    regionset version 0.1 -- reads/sets region code on DVD drives
    Current Region Code settings:
    RPC Phase: II
    type: NONE
    vendor resets available: 4
    user controlled changes resets available: 5
    drive plays discs from region(s):, mask=0xFF
    
    Would you like to change the region setting of your drive? [y/n]:n
    abc@def:~$
    I am able to play both a DVD region-2 and a DVD region-1 on this Ubuntu Jaunty system. I've checked the output of regionset (posted above) before and after both of these and it did not change, nor did I make any changes.

    I currently use a commercial program called DVDneXtCopy on a separate Windows XP machine to make such copies. I am able to start with a Region-2 DVD original, and copy it to a blank DVD, complete with additional features, subtitles and such, and it plays in my living-room DVD player. I assume this program either sets the region code to "0" or to "1" - the documentation for this program is silent on that point. It won't convert PAL to NTSC (I still use a good signal converter for that on my TV), but this is a moot point when playing on a PC. And the existence of a commercial Windows-based program for this purpose leads me to believe this is still within fair-use.

    So: Should I be able, using something like DVD::RIP or some other tool, create an ISO of my original region-2 DVD, burn the ISO onto a blank DVD with kb3, and end up with a DVD playable on a normal DVD player?

    Sorry for rambling, I wanted to provide as much relevant detail as possible, and you seem to be a very knowledgeable bunch on this. I'm not a fan of watching movies on a PC screen, and would like to perform the "copy to eliminate region-code" function on Linux, to eliminate another reason to keep Windows around.

    Also, out of sheer curiosity, does the output from regionset (above) mean that my DVD-RW drive has it's code set to 0? This used to be a Vista machine before I emancipated it, in case it's relevant.

    Thanks all in advance.

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  5. #14
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    If you can play commercial DVDs on you Linux system, then you have the dvdcss libraries installed. Personally, I use dvdbackup to rip DVDs to disc (it removes the css and region code cruft) as a pair of AUDIO_TS/VIDEO_TS directories that can be used with K3b or similar CD/DVD burning software to create an ISO file and/or burn to a blank disc. Your computer probably doesn't care if the commercial disc is NTSC or PAL, though your TV and/or DVD player might. Most DVD copy programs will not convert NTSC<->PAL. FWIW, because my TV is an HD digital panel and my DVD player is configured for region 0, I can play ANY commercial DVD from anywhere.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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