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(Just a disclaimer: this is being done on a VERY old PC with no precious files on it, just as a way to learn the in depth workings of linux; ...
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  1. #1
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    Cat mem vs. cat ram0


    (Just a disclaimer: this is being done on a VERY old PC with no precious files on it, just as a way to learn the in depth workings of linux; even if something gets irreparably messed up it's no biggy)

    Why does "cat /dev/mem" work whilst "cat /dev/ram0" does not? Are they not both reading what is currently stored in memory? (albeit the second one is reading only a section of the memory?)

  2. #2
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    /dev/ram0 is a ram disk and is unmounted after start on most systems.
    initrd(4): boot loader initialized RAM disk - Linux man page
    Debian GNU/Linux -- You know you want it.

  3. #3
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    What about the other "ram" in /dev/ then (ram1 through ram9); I don't see them mentioned in that man page; or are they performing similar functions?

  4. #4
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    Yes, you configure how many ram disks exist when you compile a new kernel.
    I think the maximum is 16.
    Debian GNU/Linux -- You know you want it.

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