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I would like to find a few Linux books that will give me a great insight on the inner workings of Linux, customizations, and truly understanding what Linux does, how ...
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  1. #1
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    I am looking for some great Linux books


    I would like to find a few Linux books that will give me a great insight on the inner workings of Linux, customizations, and truly understanding what Linux does, how it does it, and how I can make it do other cool things. I am running Ubuntu 8.04 and have been for a good year now and it is great. I can do a good bit of things, but now I want more. I really want to dig deep into the world of Linux. I am looking for just a few great books about and for Linux. Books that will show me how to run different commands, and administrate different things on my network. I need a real good reference book basically. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    The best way is to learn by doing. Figure out something you're interested in trying and learn to accomplish your goal.

    Also, try out some more hands on distros. I highly recommend Arch Linux for that.

    The Linux is a Nutshell series is highly regarded, but they are pretty techincal overall and assume some knowledge.

    The Art of Unix Programming by Eric Raymond is also a classic. I highly recommend it if only for a sense of Unix/Linux philosophy. (I'm no programmer but found much of it fascinating.)

    The GNU site is good for learning for about the Free Software movement and philosophy.

    Linux Online - Free Online Books

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    Thank you for replying so fast.

    try out some more hands on distros. I highly recommend Arch Linux for that.
    I am taking a look at Arch Linux right now. It looks like something I could really learn a lot from being that I have to build it from the ground up. I 't remind me of the linux from scratch, slackware, and gentoo. I do not know a lot about either of those distros, but I have heard how the are the more difficult ones to work with. I agree ubuntu and fedora types are easy to use and I dont mind getting down and dirty with the true Geek distro's like Arch. Out of all of the harder distro's, would you say Arch is better?

    The Linux is a Nutshell series is highly regarded, but they are pretty techincal overall and assume some knowledge.
    I will pick up or order this book from online since it is highly regarded. Also I will deffintly take a look at everything mentioned. Because I really want to understand the linux OS better.

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    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    Everyone has their own preferences. To me, Arch is home. So I'm biased.

    Linux From Scratch is definitely a learning experience. If you really want to get deep into the internals, it's a good place to do so. I would start with something a little less intensive though.

    Slackware is also good and shares a lot in common with Arch and the Arch philosophy. My opinion, there's no reason not to have automatic dependency resolution in the default package management. I personally don't find it so much educational to track down dependencies myself, as irritating. I also prefer more up to date packages.

    Gentoo is also similar to Arch is some ways. But while compiling from source is something you should learn how to do, having to compile everything from source is incredibly time consuming. Again, my opinion, too much work for little reward. Arch has a ports-like system for those times you absolutely need to compile packages to your own specifications.

    All in all, I also think Arch is easier to get the hang of than any of those. (I'm sure others would disagree, though.) To me, it's the pefect (or near as possible) blend of gentoo and slackware, with a little BSD thrown in.

    Arch Compared To Other Distros - ArchWiki

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    I am Looking at learning more using Arch.

    My opinion, there's no reason not to have automatic dependency resolution in the default package management.
    I totally agree, there is no point in wasting time. All of the things you pointed out has really helped me in making my decision. That's all I was looking for. Thanks for your help.

  7. #6
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    Books are in my signature if you need them.

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