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is there a way to enforce that a file created on a directory will inherit the owner/groupship of the his parent folder? if there is no way of doing this ...
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  1. #1
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    force create permissions


    is there a way to enforce that a file created on a directory will inherit the owner/groupship of the his parent folder?

    if there is no way of doing this on linux, is there a way to do it in java, without explicity connecting and changing the permissions? (i know java isn't the topic here)

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chesterman View Post
    is there a way to enforce that a file created on a directory will inherit the owner/groupship of the his parent folder?
    Not as far as I know. This would be a SERIOUS security breach.
    if there is no way of doing this on linux, is there a way to do it in java, without explicity connecting and changing the permissions? (i know java isn't the topic here)
    Not really. You could create a java class and/or method to do this automatically. Again, I cannot recommend this since it would be a serious security flaw. You would have no way to know that the creator of the file wasn't the owner of the directory. In forensic terms, the chain of ownership becomes suspect. Why do you want to do this?
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
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    A variation on the topic,

    Is it possible to force file creation permissions in /var/log to 640

    The reason being that tripwire complains if the permissions are looser than 640, which is fair enough. However there are applications which appear to set the log permissions to 664 even though the umask for that application user is set to 0027 which should make default file permissions 640....
    RHCE #100-015-395
    Please don't PM me with questions as no reply may offend, that's what the forums are for.

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