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what's cool and hip when it comes to audio software for linux? midi, printing scores, mixing, etc .. looking for a cakewalk type clone.. please help!!...
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  1. #1
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    Music Software


    what's cool and hip when it comes to audio software for linux? midi, printing scores, mixing, etc .. looking for a cakewalk type clone.. please help!!

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer Kieren's Avatar
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    Have a read of The table of equivalents / replacements / analogs of Windows software in Linux. (Official site of the table)

    It lists Linux alternatives to Windows programs and Cakewalk is listed:

    Code:
    1) RoseGarden.
    2) Brahms.
    3) Anthem.
    4) Melys.
    5) MuSE.
    6) MidiMountain. (KDE)
    Linux User #453176

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    Midi: Rosegarden
    Mixing: Ardour
    Printing scores: Lilypond
    Synths: Bristol and ZynAddSubFX.
    Use JACK to connect different apps.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    For mixing, recording, etc. try Audacity: Free Audio Editor and Recorder
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    re

    thank you all for the posts. that equivalents table sure is cool. =)

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    Content Team _madman_'s Avatar
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    "cool & hip" huh? Last time I checked that phrase meant I'm old, but trying to sound young I'm just messing with you. It's nice to see another victim of audio in Linux

    Grab your favorite form of caffine and head over here:
    Sound & MIDI Software For Linux

    ...that's EVERYTHING to do with audio in GNU/Linux.

    One thing that's important to note about GNU/Linux (and Unix-like systems in general) is that, although there are a zillion good programs that mock MS Windows-like design, there is also a unique breed of software programming style that you really won't find anywhere else (unless they're trying to mock us of course):
    That style is layers / pipes / redirection. For instance, all pro-audio caliber (and even some lesser) software on Linux supports JACK (the jack audio connection kit) which lets you route & control (via Qjackctl) your audio through apps and sound cards in almost any way imaginable; something that no other OS has achieved to the same degree, to date. So instead of just switching to RoseGarden (a very nice CakeWalk-like app), you might also like to try something like Seq24 (a sequencer meets drum machine-like patterns) - which sticks to the UNIX philosophy of "do one thing, and do it well".

    If you plan on getting serious with audio on Linux, it would do you well to familiarize yourself with these subjects:
    ALSA, JACK, "how to completely disable pulseaudio and use alsa instead", Qjackctl, LADSPA / LV2, Hydrogen (drum machine), MPlayer / SMPlayer, LMMS (Linux MultiMedia Studio), Ogg/Vorbis

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    Quote Originally Posted by _madman_ View Post
    If you plan on getting serious with audio on Linux, it would do you well to familiarize yourself with these subjects:
    ALSA, JACK, "how to completely disable pulseaudio and use alsa instead", Qjackctl, LADSPA / LV2, Hydrogen (drum machine), MPlayer / SMPlayer, LMMS (Linux MultiMedia Studio), Ogg/Vorbis
    So, I am another victim and I should disable the audio system that my Ubuntu thinks is the update-able dog's dangly bits, good for Totem, u-tube, flash plug-ins and every other thing that makes a noise.

    Does the (Ubuntu default) use of PulseAudio lock one out from JACK, RoseGarden, etc. ?

    Between Musix, 64Studio, dyne:bolic, and Ubuntu Studio, what common ground is there?

    Thanks for the good link. I may be able to wean myself off of ancient Voyetra Midi Orchestrator Plus in a XP VirtualBox after all.

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    Content Team _madman_'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gtrax View Post
    So, I am another victim and I should disable the audio system that my Ubuntu thinks is the update-able dog's dangly bits, good for Totem, u-tube, flash plug-ins and every other thing that makes a noise.

    Does the (Ubuntu default) use of PulseAudio lock one out from JACK, RoseGarden, etc. ?

    Between Musix, 64Studio, dyne:bolic, and Ubuntu Studio, what common ground is there?

    Thanks for the good link. I may be able to wean myself off of ancient Voyetra Midi Orchestrator Plus in a XP VirtualBox after all.
    PulseAudio is just an extra layer in your audio stack, so to speak. It's unnecessary. ALSA is your real audio system. If all your apps work just fine with PulseAudio, then don't mess with it ("if it ain't broke, don't fix it"). However, if you plan on doing any sort of serious audio work on your machine (ex:Real-time JACK), you need to rid it of the crappy PulseAudio sound server:

    Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty – Keeping the beast Pulseaudio at bay Tux’s idyllic life.

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