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Hello, first of all : I'm not an end user in the field of Open Source and Linux just I'm wondering in the field of choosing a distribution as a ...
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  1. #1
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    Debian vs OpenSuse


    Hello,
    first of all : I'm not an end user in the field of Open Source and Linux
    just I'm wondering in the field of choosing a distribution as a core distro for myself .
    I'm experienced in debian linux from the sarge till now (lenny), I'm interested in debian and i'm comfortable with this distro, but I want to figure out the differences between these two distros,
    most of my friends announced me the 11.2 version of OpenSuse and it's features .
    in fact I have no experience with OpenSuse, but I want to know it's Quality, and eventually which is the better distro for who is using linux for network security and kernel development purposes?
    for a general user what's your opinion !?
    thnx .
    /cyberoot

  2. #2
    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    OpenSuse is generally considered more "user friendly" than Debian. They offer a more out of the box polished look and feel.

    OpenSuse releases are supported for approximately 18 months.

    Debian is usually supported longer. No life cycle has been announced for Debian Lenny, but the previous aim has been one year after the following stable release, with releases aimed every 18 months, so approximately 2 1/2 years.

    Debian is more conservative with upgrading the software in their repos and so is considered more stable. They also have larger repos than OpenSuse.

    OpenSuse has more up to date software in their repos than Debian Stable. Debian is stricter about non-free software than OpenSuse.

    Either is perfectly well suited for networking and kernel dev. It's completely a matter of personal preference and needs.

  3. #3
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Reed9 pretty much summed up the situation in his/her post. As it's mostly personal preference we tend to avoid discussing it at length. Everyone has their favorites, and either one will probably work well for you. Since they don't cost anything, you can try both and see what works better.
    Registered Linux user #270181
    TechieMoe's Tech Rants

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