Find the answer to your Linux question:
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
I have an ext3 partition that I mount on windows using some driver or other (I can't remember which, but it's not fs-driver as that one doesn't like my inode ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Just Joined! TTIO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    80

    iTunes and ext3 :/


    I have an ext3 partition that I mount on windows using some driver or other (I can't remember which, but it's not fs-driver as that one doesn't like my inode sizes, or something like that).

    Now, for whatever reason, iTunes continually breaks certain sections of the filesystem and every so often I need to run fsck on it in order to get Linux to boot (Fedora 10).

    A bit annoying, but meh. The problem is that now, fsck can't actually fix the filesystem, and I can't tell why. So does anyone know of an alternative that I could try?

    I'll post the output from my attempts to fix the filesystem in single user mode when I get home, but I know that it always comes up with two unfixed problems, one of which is multiple files of the same name in the same folder. I've seen that problem and fixed it before, but this time fsck won't do it automatically, for some reason. Marks the section to be rebuilt and then does nothing with it.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    Is it a Data Partition or / partition of Linux distro?

    I would suggest you to use NTFS partition instead of ext3. Linux support NTFS partition very well.

    Anyways, boot up in Single User or Rescue Mode and run fsck again. It should fix problems.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  3. #3
    Just Joined! TTIO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    80
    It's a shared data partition - mounted on /home

    I'd heard that Linux couldn't write to NTFS that well? I'll try that if all else fails though...

    No, I've already tried fsck in single user, it doesn't work :/
    Not a clue why though, I even ran it once, rebooted back into single user and ran it again - still nothing

  4. #4
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    Could you post exact error message here? Does system boot up now?
    Have you tried to run fsck using LiveCD or mount it in LiveCD?

    NTFS is very well supported by Linux and new versions of most of Linux distro including Fedora support NTFS read/write out of box. Fedora 10 support it too.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  5. #5
    Just Joined! TTIO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    80
    It won't boot now, no. It forces a filesystem check, which it fails.
    I'll post the message when I get home, I don't think it says anything unless you boot into single user though...

    No, I've not tried a livecd yet, I'll do that when I get home as well.

    And, if all else fails, at least I have a fallback filesystem now - even if it is a proprietry one

    Thanks for your help so far

  6. #6
    Just Joined! TTIO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    80
    Okay, I've fixed one of the problems, was just a rogue folder. The second is still there though :/

    fsck 1.41.4 (27-Jan-2009)
    e2fsck 1.41.4 (27-Jan-2009)
    Docs contains a filesystem with errors, check forced.
    Pass 1: Checking inodes, blocks and sizes
    Pass 2: Checking directory structure
    Duplicate entry 'Enso?Dot.ipa' found.
    Marking /My Music/iTunes/Mobile Applications (7962649) to be rebuilt.

    Pass 3: Checking directory connectivity
    Pass 3A: Optimizing directories
    Pass 4: Checking reference counts
    Pass 5: Checking group summary information

    Docs: ***** FILE SYSTEM WAS MODIFIED *****
    Docs: x/y files (4.9% non-contiguous), a/b blocks
    Yeah, I got lazy at the end, couldn't be bothered to read and then type out all of those numbers.

  7. #7
    Linux Newbie previso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    116
    It is my impression that writing across filesystems modifies the directory tree. The same happens when you write to Windows from Linux. Upon boot the OS "sees" the checksum is different from when it last came up and tries to correct the error.
    In my experience, more than once my writing across has crashed the OS. There must be a threshold, as small writing operations do not cause this behavior. Massive deletes are definitely dangerous.
    These are empirical observations which have changed how I write across filesystems. I do not know the technical reasons or ways to modify OS behavior.
    As an alternative, you could create a FAT32 partition to keep the data, mountable from both Linux and Windows, and avoid the problem altogether.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    Quote Originally Posted by previso
    As an alternative, you could create a FAT32 partition to keep the data, mountable from both Linux and Windows, and avoid the problem altogether.
    As I mentioned earlier, Linux supports NTFS very well now. It does that using ntfs-3g package and I am using it for last 2-3 years. No problems at all.

    You can find a lot more details at ntfs-3g home page.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

  9. #9
    Just Joined! bendib's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    &Imeuta >> 4.7777777777777777
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by devils casper View Post
    As I mentioned earlier, Linux supports NTFS very well now. It does that using ntfs-3g package and I am using it for last 2-3 years. No problems at all.
    Let's see a Linux system boot with NTFS as it's root. It won't happen. Even if it did, why would you want such a HORRIBLE filesystem???

  10. #10
    Super Moderator devils casper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Chandigarh, India
    Posts
    24,729
    Quote Originally Posted by bendib View Post
    Let's see a Linux system boot with NTFS as it's root. It won't happen. Even if it did, why would you want such a HORRIBLE filesystem???
    I have never mentioned anywhere that you should use NTFS for root partition. Suggestion was for data sharing partition only.
    It is amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit.
    New Users: Read This First

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •