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Well, I forgot to edit /etc/fstab to disable filesystem checks because /home is in really bad shape and WILL prevent the system from booting if checked, but it runs fine, ...
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  1. #1
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    Linux boot params for fsck


    Well, I forgot to edit /etc/fstab to disable filesystem checks because /home is in really bad shape and WILL prevent the system from booting if checked, but it runs fine, definately fine enough to bakc things up. So now my laptop is sort of unbootable until I can either buy another sata cable and get home or something.

    I thought I remember this, but isn't there a boot parameter for not checking the filesystems on boot? editing fstab is NOT an option, remember.

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    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    The sixth field in /etc/fstab is the flag for file system checking at boot time. Normally / has a value of 1 (always check) and other file systems have a value of 2 (check every so many boots). A value of 0 means "don't check on boot". So that's what you need to do, edit /etc/fstab and change the last field for /home to 0.

    Since you cannot boot and edit /etc/fstab because of your "problem", then you need to boot from a rescue CD/DVD/USB and manually mount the root file system, edit /etc/fstab, and then you can reboot normally.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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    Hmm, okay. I was afraid of that. However I did manage to get in! apparently, after a redonculous set of minutes the disk check bails because it can't get data from the drive (media errors). So I guess I wasn't patient enough (Last night I forced a check and it went on for hours marking only like 600 kb's of unusable space). Thank's anyhow!

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
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    Assuming you are using an ext2/ext3 file system, you can use the tune2fs tool to set the recheck cycle to 0, which means that it won't check that specific file system unless it is dirty or you manually run fsck -f.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

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