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Anyone familiar and use SPF? Please share your comments and feedback. http://spf.pobox.com/downloads.html...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Oct 2004
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    52

    anyone familiar with SPF?


    Anyone familiar and use SPF? Please share your comments and feedback.

    http://spf.pobox.com/downloads.html

  2. #2
    Linux Guru
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Täby, Sweden
    Posts
    7,578
    Well, I for one have a SPF record set up in my DNS, but I haven't configured my MTA to do SPF checks on incoming mails.

    I do think that SPF is a good idea, however. I just haven't gotten around to fix it completely... there's so much more to do. Also, they don't seem to be supporting IPv6 for now, which isn't exactly a good thing.

  3. #3
    Just Joined!
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    Oct 2004
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    52
    When you say IPv6 are you referring to the new IP's? (a bit of a noob here lol).

    Also, try it out and let us know how you make out

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  5. #4
    Linux Guru
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    Oct 2001
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    Täby, Sweden
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    7,578
    When I say IPv6 I refer to the Internet Protocol version 6, as opposed to version 4. IPv5 is what is in use by the major part of the Internet today, and is about 20-30 years old. IPv4 is what keeps track of addressing and routing -- you know normal IP addresses like 1.2.3.4. IPv6 has lots of advantages, not the least being the fact that its address space is 128 bits instead of the 32 bit one of IPv4.
    My IPv4 address is 82.182.133.20. The IPv6 address for my router is 2002:52b6:8514:100::1. Since IPv6 is so great, I don't need NAT to support my internal network either -- all my computers are globally visible to the entire IPv6 Internet. The IPv6 address for this workstation I'm using right now is 2002:52b6:8514:200:20c:76ff:fe3b:a3f4. That's a global address, which everyone on the entire IPv6 Internet can access, not one of those pesky 192.168.x.x address of IPv4 which noone can access if I don't set up a NAT mapping. I don't need DHCP for IPv6 either, since IPv6 is so great that it autoconfigures itself.

  6. #5
    Just Joined!
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    Oct 2004
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    52
    Thanks for explaining it. I understand now. I did hear about IPv6 before but was not clear of its whole purpose until now.

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