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Bpark, It looks like I was wrong. I just did a reinstall of a w2k machine and it using 28MB of kernel memory (only used by OS). On XP the ...
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  1. #11
    Linux User Allblack's Avatar
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    Bpark,

    It looks like I was wrong. I just did a reinstall of a w2k machine and it using 28MB of kernel memory (only used by OS). On XP the kernel memory is 35MB. Not much of a difference though

    I based myself on an old test I once did. Turn out I was wrong back then.

    Cheers

  2. #12
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    No prob. I was just amazed since Windows XP is such a resource hungry OS and in most gaming magazines I've read, they say to stay away from this unless you have more then 256MB of RAM installed. I've used it and honestly, it just runs stupid programs that I don't need.
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allblack
    I just did a reinstall of a w2k machine and it using 28MB of kernel memory (only used by OS). On XP the kernel memory is 35MB.
    35MBs of kernel memory?!?! You're kidding me?! Not even Winbloze can such that much! Are you sure of this? Where did you find it out? Maybe it includes cache buffers?

    Quote Originally Posted by bpark
    I think what Dolda2000 is suggesting is that it must be on the first partition of any hard drive.
    Actually, I did mean the first hard drive, but it's very possible that I was wrong. I know that Windows' bootloader has a lot of restrictions, but I'm not sure just which ones. At the very least, I'm pretty sure that it has to be on a primary partition.
    Btw., gzunk, what boot loader are you using? I was under the impression that at least Windows' bootloader (although maybe not the actual partition) needed to be on the first hard drive, lest you perform a BIOS virtual drive mapping with GRUB.

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  5. #14
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    Dolda,

    I think Windows can be on ANY drive as long as it resides on the first partition of it. I'm assuming this has to do with Windows' chain loading method.
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  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dolda2000
    Btw., gzunk, what boot loader are you using? I was under the impression that at least Windows' bootloader (although maybe not the actual partition) needed to be on the first hard drive, lest you perform a BIOS virtual drive mapping with GRUB.
    I am using GRUB. I used to use the Adaptec SCSI BIOS to switch the boot drive every time I wanted to boot into the different OS's I have installed (WinXP, Win98SE and SuSE) - i.e. I had 3 different MBR's on each drive.

    I got fed up with this so I re-installed to give me SuSE and Win98SE on the first drive and booted them using GRUB. I continued to use the BIOS switching method for a while for XP then I decided to take the plunge. I read (from the Microsoft site I believe) that XP doesn't have to be on the first drive, and also that GRUB can do this BIOS switching thing. Now I didn't wholly trust the Microsoft advice, and also when i installed XP it was on the first drive, so I thought that there was a good chance that I wouldn't be able to boot XP.

    I was pleasantly surprised when it did work (no more entering SCSI BIOS for me!) but I also noticed that Windows appeared to realise that it wasn't on the first drive - and had still managed to boot. I then found out that some other people hadn't got the GRUB BIOS switching to work...

    Anyway here's my menu.lst from GRUB:

    title SuSE Linux 8.1
    kernel (hd0,2)/boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/sda3 hda=ide-scsi hdc=ide-scsi vga=788
    initrd (hd0,2)/boot/initrd

    title Windows 98
    root (hd0,0)
    makeactive
    chainloader +1

    title Windows XP
    map (hd0) (hd1)
    map (hd1) (hd0)
    rootnoverify (hd1,0)
    makeactive
    chainloader +1

    I haven't removed the map lines - mainly because I'm worried that I won't get a booting XP if I do that - no matter what I believe!

  7. #16
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    gzunk,
    Those map lines are the BIOS drive remapping. That probably explains why it works. Windows must at least be made to think that it has to reside on the first drive, and that's what the mapping does. I did get surprised when you said that it worked even though Windows wasn't on your first drive, since GRUB's reference manual explicitly states that so is the case. In the same section, it suggests those map commands to fool Windows into thinking that it's on the first drive.
    What they do more specifically is to tell the BIOS to let drive 81h be referenced as 80h and vice versa. The BIOS numbers floppy drive 00h through 7Fh, and hard drives 80h to FFh.

    bpark,
    While Windows' boot loader does suck, it does not require to be on the first partition. Remember that many people have a Linux /boot partition before it.

  8. #17
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    Are you absolutely sure about that? I ran into trouble with that about a year ago since mine was on the second partition. I've seen many instances of this and I always thought that it had to be on the first partition. Well, I should no better to doubt your knowledge but I guess I just want to be absolutely sure about it.
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  9. #18
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    Maybe your partition table was simply set up erroneously? I think that the Windows "root partition" has to be the one which has the bootable flag set on it.

  10. #19
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    Dolda - I'm not sure if the map lines are doing anything, since other people have reported failure in using them, and my installation says that it's installed on drive 2. Saying that, however, I agree with you in that that is likely the explanation why it works - which is why I'm not changing it! Perhaps since I have a SCSI bios that "knows" how to boot from all 15 devices that could be attached to it has something to do with it. I don't know - but it works and that's all I care about.

    bpark - I'm fairly sure that the limitation is that it has to be a primary partition, not a logical partition - thus if your second partition was a logical partition then you wouldn't be able to boot from it. I never use logical partitions - I've never needed more than the four primary partitions that you can have.

  11. #20
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    gzunk,

    I never said anything about it being on a logical partition. I just stated that it had to be the FIRST partition on any disk.
    Quote Originally Posted by gzunk
    thus if your second partition was a logical partition then you wouldn't be able to boot from it.
    How can the second partition be a logical partition? Doesn't a logical partition start after the fourth partition on a drive?

    Dolda,
    Are you saying that the Windows root partition has to have the boot flag turned on? How about chainloading and it's offset? If a Windows root is the first partition, then we just need to pass +1 to it. If it was the second partition, I supposed this would be fine as long as we can find the offset.
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