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Originally Posted by ford ...Occasionally, if a package changes drastically, you will lose all of the settings for that package and potentially data associated with it. There is also the ...
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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ford View Post
    ...Occasionally, if a package changes drastically, you will lose all of the settings for that package and potentially data associated with it. There is also the threat of an update leaving you in an inoperable state. ...
    That's a scary scenario and not one I can ever be prepared for.

    Quote Originally Posted by ford View Post
    ... When you do your partitioning I highly recommend that you put /home on its own partition. This way you are forever safe from reinstalls. You keep your configs and files, even if you do have to reinstall your OS and applications.
    I've always done things this way. The real problem is re-installing all of the applications. That's also how Windows works. I was not fond of it and was hoping Linux was better than that. The problem is that I don't have an inventory of what's installed and would discover what's missing as I go along. This is very time consuming.

    Quote Originally Posted by ford View Post
    ...There is a scientific rolling release btw.
    What's a scientific rolling release?

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    Quote Originally Posted by yopered View Post
    What's a scientific rolling release?
    You can check this link for more info on Scientific's rolling release:

    https://www.scientificlinux.org/docu...istro.versions
    oz

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    Quote Originally Posted by yopered View Post
    I've always done things this way. The real problem is re-installing all of the applications. That's also how Windows works. I was not fond of it and was hoping Linux was better than that. The problem is that I don't have an inventory of what's installed and would discover what's missing as I go along. This is very time consuming.
    It's easy enough to make a list of installed packages, if that's the case.

    Quote Originally Posted by ford
    There are a few things to point out though. Rolling release distributions are not as stable as interval release distributions. Occasionally, if a package changes drastically, you will lose all of the settings for that package and potentially data associated with it. There is also the threat of an update leaving you in an inoperable state.
    I suppose that's possible, but it's a pretty rare scenario. Rolling release distros do require attention to updates, I'll grant. But really, given the number of times I've seen complaints of this or that breaking during regular updates of other distros, there hardly seems to be an increased risk here.

    If there are major changes to a package (which you'd have to deal with eventually in any distro), the distro website ought to have a notification. You should check the distro's website and forums for potential problems before updating any important package as a matter of good practice. But breaking backwards compatibility is something most software projects do not take lightly.

    I can say wholly anecdotally, I've personally had less breakage using Arch than I ever had using Mint, Mandriva, Ubuntu, or any other of the dozens of distros I tried before settling down.

    Quote Originally Posted by ford
    :: EDIT :: There is a scientific rolling release btw.
    I say if you're going to go rolling release, go with something that wants to be stable and usable enough for everyday use. Not something that is explicitly a testing ground.

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    Linux Engineer MASONTX's Avatar
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    In 3 years of using ubuntu, I have only had one break down, and that was due to an interupted download. No data was lost, and it was easy to fix.
    Registered Linux user #526930

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    A Scientific rolling release, where?

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    Linux Guru reed9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PrinceSharma View Post
    A Scientific rolling release, where?
    It's not really a rolling release. It's more like Fedora Rawhide.

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    Yes...Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by reed9 View Post
    [...It's more like Fedora Rawhide.
    Thanks for the clarification. I was looking at "scientific" and couldn't see the rolling part. There were 3 versions, and support for V3 just ended, so they're down to 2. But they never roll from 3 to 4, 4 to 5, etc. So it's not really the kind of Linux I was hoping to find.

    I appreciate the responses I've been getting here. I think I'll try Arch. I've got an old machine to load it on and see how easy it is to configure. Does it run OK on an old machine? I won't be doing much, just playing with configuration.

    I've been spoiled by the GUI drake configurator in PCLinuxOS. Although I don't mind editing conf files, it's always a bit of work finding the one I need to edit. I'm guessing Arch is the same, right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by yopered View Post
    I don't mind editing conf files, it's always a bit of work finding the one I need to edit. I'm guessing Arch is the same, right?
    Yes, the config files in Arch are manually edited but Arch has great documentation so it's not hard to find the proper files to edit.
    oz

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    Quote Originally Posted by reed9 View Post
    ...It's easy enough to make a list of installed packages, if that's the case. ...
    Right. All I do is start Synaptic and it gives me the whole list, all 1814 packages. I'm just a bit intimidated by that number. This is why I haven't tried to upgrade my current Linux. Is there perhaps a more concise list somewhere?

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