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Dear All, I had some bad experience with Ubuntu (namely version 10.10 and 11.10). Those two versions crashed after using two month from the fresh installation in two different used ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie amithad's Avatar
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    Unhappy Rock Solid Linux on Second Hand (Used) PCs


    Dear All,

    I had some bad experience with Ubuntu (namely version 10.10 and 11.10). Those two versions crashed after using two month from the fresh installation in two different used PCs.

    Normally used PCs have defective HDD drives which windows users used their OS by chkdsk command to avoid bad sectors and use the HDD

    When It comes to Ubuntu I had to use e2fsck command to recover the Ubuntu OS. But most of the time I had to do it again and again.

    I know Ubuntu is a very good Desktop OS has so many software to chose but my concern is to have a stable rock-solid OS to run in old computers.

    What distribution I should use
    or what are the changes I should do in my Ubuntu OS ?????

  2. #2
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    If your HDD is dead, find a new one. I'm about to throw a bunch of 4GB, 6GB and 10GB to the junk. It must be easy to find one for a very small price (or given, do knock on enterprises's doors, they may give old computers).
    To have a better reliability on your HDD, you may follow this ( /!\ time consuming) :
    -run Memtest during 7 full tests before installing
    -activate S.M.A.R.T in your BIOS
    -Run
    Code:
    badblocks -vw /dev/hda (or sda)
    on your HDD before installing : the HDD will be written / readen 4 times on each sector, triggering the internal auto repair of the HDD.
    -Manually format your partition using
    Code:
    mke2fs -c /dev/hda1 (or sda1)
    -Install smartmontools
    -Run
    Code:
    tune2fs -c1 /dev/hda1 (or sda1)
    to have your filesystem checked at every reboot
    Last edited by CaptainDangeax; 10-15-2012 at 05:02 PM.

  3. #3
    Linux Newbie amithad's Avatar
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    Thanks Captain

  4. #4
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    You're welcome. For everybody's experience, would you please share the results of those advices on your old PC ?

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie amithad's Avatar
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    Dear All,

    The details are as follows

    Hardware
    Memory 1.5 GB
    Processor Intel Dual Core (PIV) 3.2 GHz CPU
    HDD 80GB (sda1 20 GB (ext4) ,sda5 20 GB (ntfs), sda6 sda6 40 GB (ntfs)


    Software
    Linux Kernel 3.0.0.-12-generic
    GNOME 3.2.0
    Ubuntu 11.10

  6. #6
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    Eeek ? Why are you using NTFS partitions if you don't have a dual boot with Windows on your PC ? Are you looking for troubles ?

  7. #7
    Linux Newbie amithad's Avatar
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    Im asking this since I have lack of knowledge on this. If I have NTFS partiions with EXT4 file system does that cause OS crash?

  8. #8
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    Let's explain. NTFS is Windows file system, and its features are different of the ones used in Unix / Linux systems. The 2 main differences I see are :
    -NTFS does not manage file rights like in the Unix / Linux world. For example, all files on NTFS are considered executable (a major flaw and a wide open gate to malwares of all kind)
    -NTFS does not manage file links (or at least not like in the Unix / Linux world) and the 2 kind of file links are mandatory to have a stable Linux system, for sharing libraries, for access to system files in a chroot environment, et caetera
    So, why use a NTFS is a linux box ?
    If case you have a dual boot and you need to share datas between Windows and Linux and you don't have a network storage.
    If those 3 conditions are TRUE, you may use a NTFS partition on your Linux box. Even then, you must respect some rules : NO PARTITION FROM THE STANDARD LINUX TREE MUST RESIDE ON NTFS. Put your NTFS shares partition on something like /media/windowsshare, /public or even /home/amithad/ntfs_share...
    I really wonder why you choosed to make 2 NTFS partitions. Compatibility is poor, performance are low, reliability is not at top (even on a M$ system). They're some many good file systems for Linux. XFS if you want a file system with a big throuput for big files, ext4 is stable and general purpose very fast too, JFS seems to fit very well with SSD... So, why NTFS ?

  9. #9
    Linux Newbie amithad's Avatar
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    Thanks a lot CaptainDangeax !

    The main purpose of having those two NTFS volumes is to backup data in case the Ubuntu OS fails (since my bad experience). It's better is I can have an EXT4 files system partition apart from Linux OS file system hierarchy (/home, /var, boot, /opt etc..) to have my backups in a separate partition. I may wrong some times but I think that's better.

  10. #10
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    I will talk about myself. I have a network access storage. It's a standard PC with 2 HDD of 2TB each. One is hosting the whole system and all my data ; the data is stored in the /pub directory. The second HDD is mounted in the /backup directory, and every night, using the RSYNC instruction, the data in /pub is backed up in the /backup directory. I also have an external HDD, formatted using NTFS, and mounted to the /backupext directory. Like the other one, the data in /pub is RSYNCed every other night to /backupext. Because the external disc is NTFS, I can plug it to any PC, Windows or Linux, to recover my data In the only case the 2 other drives are dead, because, as I said before, NTFS will loose some of the information in my file system, like the file owner or the access rights. It's not more difficult to recover data from an ext4-formatted disc, than from an NTFS-formatted disc. Sometimes Linux can save your ass, like I did yesterday removing 2 annoying malwares from my windows setup...
    So, talking about your NTFS partitions, you may have the whole Linux tree residing on an ext4 partition, and duplicate the important data to a primary backup partition, mounted as /backup for example, with the use of RSYNC...

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