Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Just found a cool little program called Hardinfo that runs under Linux(you can find it in your Ubuntu Software Center) and has tons of applications for finding out stuff about ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Crossville, TN. USA
    Posts
    827

    Benchmarking your computer.


    Just found a cool little program called Hardinfo that runs under Linux(you can find it in your Ubuntu Software Center) and has tons of applications for finding out stuff about your computer including a Benchmarking program called CPU Blowfish. I tested my Dell 1521 with the single core Sempron 2.0GHz processor against the slightly older HP nc 8230 with a Pentium "M" at 1.86GHz and believe it or not the slower Pentium "M" had better numbers(not by much, 21.08 for the "M" vs 19.75 for the AMD) so it just goes to show processor speed isn't the "end all, be all" of computer speed. Anyway, just thought I'd pass this along. Enjoy.

  2. #2
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,533
    Benchmarks are like statistics - there are lies, damned lies, and then there are statistics...
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Crossville, TN. USA
    Posts
    827
    Ok, just to update, I guess the lower numbers are the better numbers, that means that the AMD actually did edge out the Pentium "M" by just a bit but dang, 2.0GHz vs 1.86GHz, what would you expect. My wife's Compaq CQ57 with a Core 2 Duo 1.5GHz came was in the mid 14's, not too shabby.
    Benchmarking an actually system(not just the processor) is Nothing like Statistics, if you run the same program on each machine and measure the time it takes it is a Real World demonstration of just how well the machine did the task. Just like taking your car/truck to the local 1/8th mile and running it for time, fast is fast and slow is slow, nothing to lie about, facts are facts.

  4. #4
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,533
    Quote Originally Posted by TNFrank View Post
    Ok, just to update, I guess the lower numbers are the better numbers, that means that the AMD actually did edge out the Pentium "M" by just a bit but dang, 2.0GHz vs 1.86GHz, what would you expect. My wife's Compaq CQ57 with a Core 2 Duo 1.5GHz came was in the mid 14's, not too shabby.
    Benchmarking an actually system(not just the processor) is Nothing like Statistics, if you run the same program on each machine and measure the time it takes it is a Real World demonstration of just how well the machine did the task. Just like taking your car/truck to the local 1/8th mile and running it for time, fast is fast and slow is slow, nothing to lie about, facts are facts.
    To an extent, that is true, provided you use exactly the same OS, kernel, packages, settings, etc. Doing benchmarking is part of my job as senior systems/performance engineer for a major manufacturer. Getting different systems configured properly to run a benchmark is difficult, and then you need to tune each system's OS to utilize the differences in hardware, otherwise you aren't properly benchmarking them - you want to take advantage of the new/different capabilities of the hardware.

    Anyway, my remark about "statistics" was more related to how some (mostly software) vendors "benchmark" their product vs. others - databases are infamous for this.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  5. #5
    Linux Newbie slw210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    South Central Florida
    Posts
    194
    Quote Originally Posted by Rubberman View Post
    To an extent, that is true, provided you use exactly the same OS, kernel, packages, settings, etc. Doing benchmarking is part of my job as senior systems/performance engineer for a major manufacturer. Getting different systems configured properly to run a benchmark is difficult, and then you need to tune each system's OS to utilize the differences in hardware, otherwise you aren't properly benchmarking them - you want to take advantage of the new/different capabilities of the hardware.

    Anyway, my remark about "statistics" was more related to how some (mostly software) vendors "benchmark" their product vs. others - databases are infamous for this.
    So often very true.

    TNFrank,

    Take for instance your OTHER THREAD, where the person intensionally set up Windows to be worse than his beloved Arch.

    Arch Linux vs Ubuntu 12.04 vs Windows 7 32 bit

    For the test, I am using Ubuntu 12.04 which has linux-3.2.0.24 kernel and gnome 3.4 desktop along with Unity. Arch has a 3.0.28.1-lts (long term support) kernel and gnome-shell 3.4. Both these system are full up to date while Windows 7, I care not to update.
    I also noticed he passed on testing real world benchmark criteria.

    There are more extensive programs and tools that can help you benchmarking your system (including converting a video file using ffmpeg, encoding an audio etc) but I choose just these two for the simplicity.
    Also

    Just like taking your car/truck to the local 1/8th mile and running it for time, fast is fast and slow is slow, nothing to lie about, facts are facts.
    But, would you have the same results on the 1/4 mile, 1/2 mile, 1 mile?

  6. #6
    Linux Guru Rubberman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    I can be found either 40 miles west of Chicago, in Chicago, or in a galaxy far, far away.
    Posts
    11,533
    But, would you have the same results on the 1/4 mile, 1/2 mile, 1 mile?
    Yeah. Cache settings and amount of RAM can have MAJOR impacts upon I/O performance. Again, configuring benchmarks to give an honest comparison of two different systems is a non-trivial exercise.
    Sometimes, real fast is almost as good as real time.
    Just remember, Semper Gumbi - always be flexible!

  7. #7
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Crossville, TN. USA
    Posts
    827
    1/8th mile vs 1 mile may give different results because of gearing. My V8, S10 Chevy has 3.73:1 gears and is really quick but I'd probably hit red line(5500rpm for the stock bottom end on a 5.7L) at a lower top speed then someone running a 2.73:1 gear so over the long run they'd go faster and pass me by on the long haul.
    All my computers run 12.04LTS and are updated regularly so as far as Op System they're all the same. The difference is in the hardware, which is what I'm actually testing with the CPU Blowfish benchmark test.

    My "anti-benchmarking" comment was aimed at when someone just Benchmarks the CPU alone, solo, all by it's self and then tries to say it's better then another CPU. There's too many other factors that play into it. That's why a total system Benchmark is more valid IMHO then just doing the CPU all by it's lonesome.
    Anyway, just thought it was kind of a neat little app that does more then just Benchmarks, it'll also give you system specs too.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •