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View Poll Results: Do you agree that our governments should encourage schools to teach and use Linux?

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As Linux community is growing larger and larger around the world, I think the Linux community must consider our advancement in the future, Therefore I come into thinking that if ...
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  1. #1
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    For the sake of Linux development.


    As Linux community is growing larger and larger around the world, I think the Linux community must consider our advancement in the future, Therefore I come into thinking that if Linux is to flourish, we must begin our mission at schools!

    As we might find out that in our local schools, they teach pupils Micosoft's stuff, when people use microshit stuff, there is always a licensing problem, this might cost the governments hundreds of millions of dollars. So if our governments switched to Linux at schools, well, need not to say, we could save huge sum here! Many governments around the world already came into this conclusion, eg, from the German army to the government of Beijing in China, they already switched to using Linux recently.

    Why I suggest we start from schools? Simple, isn't it? The point is that when comes to learning, Young people always learn faster and better!

    Another big reason is that there will be more IT professionals becoming Linuxers, this also means more people will develope or spend on Linux. Linux then will become more easy and compatible.

    All in all, as a tax payer, We could save loads of tax money!
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  2. #2
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    I totaly agree on you there! In Norway, I installed GNU/Linux on a machine, and convinced the teacher that GNU/Linux was pretty good etc (Redhat 7.2) but some days after, the teacher had called the local goverment tech-support center, and asked if all this where ok, wich he assumed it to be. So, he got an reply that since Microsoft had an special deal with the school system, the school would loose all technical support, like if we had an GNU/Linux computer on the network, and the router died, they wouldnt replace it because of GNU/Linux! Pretty dumb, eh?

    But havent the Chineese goverment developed their own GNU/Linux distro? RedFlag, based on Redhat? Also, if you set up an budget on how many computers there are in the scool, and the office license, and sum those numbers up to all, im shure you can convince them that what they are using is wrong. Let me quote Bradley Khun (vicepresident or something in FSF):

    After all, if you are in school to study computer science, then a professor saying "use this proprietary software to learn computer science" is the same as English professor handing you a copy of Shakespeare and saying "use this book to learn Shakespeare without opening to book itself".

  3. #3
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    LOL! You are right, We do have Redflag Linux here, but I have never tried it before, Cause I am not convinced by their pace at developing Linux, well it is real slow! I think the Hong Kong Version of Thiz Linux is even better than Redflag! LOL. Hm, When comes to IT, I think we Chinese are still behind our Asian counterparts, for example India and Japan. I think India is the faster growing IT country in the world. They are very talented in this area.
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  5. #4
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    Yeah, I've heard that India is basically switching most of their computer systems to GNU/Linux systems, which is pretty cool.

  6. #5
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    One problem here is how much of the IT staff in schools even know linux? From my past experiences with them, they barely even know how to use windows. Image the cost of trying to train or having to rehire thousands of IT staff to just admin the linux workstations. Also they still need to have windows cause the business world isn't ready for linux yet. I have yet to walk into an office and see linux on any of the computers. I doubt many students in school would even be able to grasp linux. Its not something you can learn without wanting to. Linux is a lot like biology, students sit through the class and learn enough to pass the class. After it is over, they don't remember a single thing from it. The same will be with a linux class, now is that worth the extra money of hiring staff that can admin the linux computers? Anyone who wants to learn linux and will contribute to the community will learn linux whether it is taught in school or not. Now I am not bashing your idea cause I wish my school had a linux class so I could of taught the teacher a thing or 2 Its just that right now, I don't see a linux class as saving the school any money. Atleast not into users are able to admin linux without knowing what they are doing like you can with windows.

  7. #6
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    Also they still need to have windows cause the business world isn't ready for linux yet.
    I don't know about you, but I see a lot of companies and businesses switching to Linux.

  8. #7
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    I don't know where you live but in the US, it isn't happening. I don't know of any businesses that use linux in their office. Happen to know of any major businesses that do?

  9. #8
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    Sure.

    IBM, HP, Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley, Lehman Brothers, Sun, and Oracle to name a few.

  10. #9
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    I know for a fact that the hp offices out in cali do not use linux. I don't see how any of those companies would use linux in the office when windows has been made standard. How often do you find an administrative assistant proficient in linux apps? Also I was browsing some of the company sites and all of the admin assistant jobs required knowlege of ms office. Don't know if that means anything relevant but it dose prove my point about what I said with windows still being needed in schools since its a requirement to know by just about every company.

  11. #10
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    Businesses are slowly changing their platforms to Linux. Why? It's free. Should schools teach this stuff? Well, all I can say is that the university that I attended didn't teach anything like it. The only thing I got out of going there was learning how to program in C and C++ (this is not all true. I learned these languages by studying day and nights. Classes didn't offer any insights or motivation). I know that some Canadian schools offer classes on Linux. I think it's really a matter of supply and demand. Even with that being said, many college graduates need to get some type of certification or experience before applying for a job so I don't think Linux classes in universities is a must.
    The best things in life are free.

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