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I often thought about why different version of Linux used different commands in terminal to do updates, upgrades, installs, ect. but I think I may have hit on why and ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    apt-get, yum, pacman,yast,ect.


    I often thought about why different version of Linux used different commands in terminal to do updates, upgrades, installs, ect. but I think I may have hit on why and I wanted to see if it may be correct.
    Debian, for instance, uses "apt-get" because that points it at the Debian Repository for updates and such. Fedora uses "yum" because that points it at the Fedora Repository for packages. Others have different Repos so they need a way for them to be pointed at the correct repo in terminal so that's where the command "apt-get" or "yum" comes in. Is that about it or are they doing it just to be "different"? LOL

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Early days of Linux the distro were like the political parties and each had their way of approaching things and development paths, kind of like the two roots of the Unix tree AT&T and BSD. There are multiple Linux's because each feels they have better ways to approach things. Over time distros come and go and these days there are two main branchs Debian family and RedHat family and each has their own packaging approaches and tools to address differences in their Linux's. The good thing with Linux is each has influenced the other via user feedback wanting feature the other branch has. So the differenes in distros helps to spawn innovation in all the others.

  3. #3
    Linux User Steven_G's Avatar
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    Plus they also just flat out use different tool suites to do the job. "apt" is a whole set of related tools tied together in one "program". When you use something like:

    Code:
    sudo apt-get update
    What's going on "behind the screen" is that you're tell apt to execute with admin privileges (sudo) and to literally "get" updates. apt then checks all of the address (urls) in your sources list to see if any of them have newer versions of your software to install. If so that kicks off the next step in the process; which is to invoke downloading tools, then several more tools are invoked automagically by apt to actually install / upgrade the software and to register those upgrades with the rest of the system.

    Google "apt man page" for more info. In the .deb branch "related" tools are: aptitude, dpkg (both CLI) and synaptic (GUI).

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    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    They are just different tools for the same job, like a screwdriver and a hammer...
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



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  6. #5
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    Ahh, ok, that kind of helps to clear it up a bit. I just always wondered how "Linux" could have so many different ways of doing the same thing and now I think I'm starting to understand. While Debian and Red Hat(Fedora) are a couple of the major players, Arch and OpenSUSE seems to be pretty major as well and even though I don't see it as much Slackware has been around since the early days and is probably used by quite a few folks too.
    So, just how many "ways" are there? I know about "apt-get"(Debian) and "yum"(Red Hat/Fedora) and "pacman"(Arch) and there's one for OpenSUSE(can't remember it off hand, zupper or zipper, something like that) but can someone post a list of the Major Players and what "way" they use to get stuff in Terminal? Thanks.

  7. #6
    Penguin of trust elija's Avatar
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    There are quite a few package managers out there...
    "I used to be with it, then they changed what it was.
    Now what was it isn't it, and what is it is weird and scary to me.
    It'll happen to you too."

    Grandpa Simpson



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  8. #7
    Linux Engineer TNFrank's Avatar
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    So these are just Package Managers then?? Does that mean I could install "apt-get" in a non-Debian system and use it to manage the packages? Still not had any clear definition of which systems are the root systems.
    Debian, Red Hat/Fedora, Arch, OpenSUSE, Slackware, ??? what else or are there just 5 main, core systems in place for Linux?

  9. #8
    Linux Engineer docbop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNFrank View Post
    So these are just Package Managers then?? Does that mean I could install "apt-get" in a non-Debian system and use it to manage the packages? Still not had any clear definition of which systems are the root systems.
    Debian, Red Hat/Fedora, Arch, OpenSUSE, Slackware, ??? what else or are there just 5 main, core systems in place for Linux?
    If you google around you can get more details on differeces in packages and package managers. Here's a start for you that outlines some issuesl

    How does Debian/apt differ from RedHat/rpm? : linux

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