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When I type: df -H , this is what I get: Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/sda6 55G 9.4G 43G 19% / devtmpfs 515M 0 515M 0% /dev ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
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    What are these things that are mounted on my system by default?


    When I type: df -H , this is what I get:

    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda6 55G 9.4G 43G 19% /
    devtmpfs 515M 0 515M 0% /dev
    tmpfs 522M 78k 522M 1% /dev/shm
    tmpfs 522M 828k 521M 1% /run
    tmpfs 522M 0 522M 0% /sys/fs/cgroup
    tmpfs 522M 17k 522M 1% /tmp


    The only line I understand is the "dev/sda6" one. What are the rest of these things? And what do the mount points mean? (/dev/shm etc.)


    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    Just let me Google that for you...

    What is a tempfs? Overview of RAMFS and TMPFS on Linux

    Some (old) information about the /dev (and the /proc) filesystems: Linux.com :: Using the /dev and /proc file systems

    In your list the /tmp mountpoint is where the system writes temporary files - because its tmpfs, it's in memory which is much quicker than disk. This is a Good Thing.

    The /run filesystem, at a guess stores the pidfiles for various processes - again in memory so it's a good thing.

    I'm not familiar with devtmpfs, but I'd hazard a guess that it's another memory filesystem dedicated to devices.
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roxoff View Post

    The /run filesystem, at a guess stores the pidfiles for various processes - again in memory so it's a good thing.
    Not just pidfiles. /run is for anything that's specific to the current session. I believe it used to be /var/run.

    I'm not familiar with devtmpfs, but I'd hazard a guess that it's another memory filesystem dedicated to devices.
    Yes, it's the replacement for the old permanent /dev directory that you used to get with 2.4 kernels.

    @OP. Roxoff is quite right. You could have googled all this for yourself.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"

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