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When systemd runs as PID 1, it is just a replacement for init. It creates userspace and subsequently acts as a babysitter for daemons. That is well-documented. But it is ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    What are the secondary instances of systemd for?


    When systemd runs as PID 1, it is just a replacement for init. It creates userspace and subsequently acts as a babysitter for daemons. That is well-documented.

    But it is also possible to launch additional instances of systemd, running either for the system or for a user. In fact the pam_systemd.so module automatically creates such an instance for each new user who logs in. What exactly are these for? What, if anything, do they do? I can't find any documentation on them at all.

    No flames please! I know systemd is controversial but I am neither for nor against it. I built my current LFS with systemd simply because I wanted to do something new and learn something.
    Last edited by hazel; 06-08-2014 at 05:34 PM. Reason: small error correction
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
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  2. #2
    Linux Engineer hazel's Avatar
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    It's OK. I found this in the Arch wiki.
    "I'm just a little old lady; don't try to dazzle me with jargon!"
    www.hrussman.entadsl.com

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