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Why does Linux still use the UNIX file permissions on a FAT file system? Shouldn't it use the FAT file attributes instead?...
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  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
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    Linux doesn't support FAT file attributes


    Why does Linux still use the UNIX file permissions on a FAT file system? Shouldn't it use the FAT file attributes instead?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    by FAT attributes, do you mean handling files the way windows does?

  3. #3
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    I don't know much about the various filesystems, but I thought that FAT, NTFS, ext2, etc, are only responsible for placing files on the physical disk and recording their size attributes, not their permission settings.

    ...

    Er, now that I think about it, that doesn't make sense, because a file can still be zero bytes long and have permissions. So does that mean that the filesystem can store various arbitrary attributes about each file and it's up to the OS to make sense of them?
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  4. #4
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    mmmmk! Whats the question actually?
    the security from linux is different from windows no matter whats the file system! FAT isnt owned by noone, its a file system...
    as for the security, I suspect that you've mounted the drive without giving it access to the users... please post the reading on this command so we can help a little further
    Code:
    cat /etc/fstab
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  5. #5
    Linux Guru lakerdonald's Avatar
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    That's not what he's asking at all.
    All he's saying is that he can't figure out why they use traditional Unix file attributes (UID, GID, etc.) on the FAT fs instead of Windows attributes.

  6. #6
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    EDIT : Mabye user222 could be a little more specific
    \"Meditative mind\'s is like a vast ocean... whatever strikes the surface, the bottom stays calm\" - Dalai Lama
    \"Competition ultimatly comes down to one thing... a loser and a winner.\" - Ugo Deschamps

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by UgoDeschamps
    EDIT : Mabye user222 could be a little more specific
    FAT file attributes=Read Only; Archive; Hidden; System (the ones in DOS and Windows)

  8. #8
    Linux User zeeone's Avatar
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    Oh, I am game, Because Linux is Unix based? Put a DOS disk in, can you read it? I do not understand the question.

  9. #9
    Linux Guru loft306's Avatar
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    linux can read just about every fs out there if the suport is in the kernel far it....though it cant write to some(NTFS comes to mind) though there is a package/app that lets you write to ntfs i just cant remember the name of it at this time....ask WaterSoul
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  10. #10
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    Are you thinking of Captive-NTFS?
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