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  1. #1
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    Linux book


    I know this question has been asked repeatedly, but I was wondering if I could get some personalized advice, by letting you know what my background in CS is, and what my goals are. I have a solid (not extensive) CS background, I have read the following books:

    • Computer science: An overview, by Glenn Brookshear
    • Computer organization and architectue, by William Stallings
    • Modern operating systems, by Andrew Tanenbaum
    • The C Programming language, by Kernighan and Ritchie


    Now I want to aquire more practical skills with Linux itself, and the command line. A book that covers the basics, like the file system, memory management, command line commands, and maybe some other things, bu I would settle with that :P .

    I appreciate any help you can provide. Thank you very much!

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer drl's Avatar
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    Hi, CarterCox.

    Welcome to the forums.

    For a beginning list of books, see post #6 in thread https://www.unix.com/unix-for-beginn...read-file.html for a first cut at a list, emphasizing shell & command line, as well as in-depth topics by Stevens.

    This list does not address System Administration -- that is something different altogether.

    Noted is at least one book available on-line free, and at least one in Kindle format.

    Best wishes ... cheers, drl
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  3. #3
    Linux Guru Segfault's Avatar
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    Linux is everywhere, and so are Linux users. There is always someone who already did what you want to do. Thus, searching skills are paramount to advance fast.

    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=best+Linux...b=v23__&ia=web

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    Quote Originally Posted by drl View Post
    Hi, CarterCox.

    Welcome to the forums.

    For a beginning list of books, see post #6 in thread [...] for a first cut at a list, emphasizing shell & command line, as well as in-depth topics by Stevens.

    This list does not address System Administration -- that is something different altogether.

    Noted is at least one book available on-line free, and at least one in Kindle format.

    Best wishes ... cheers, drl
    Those books seem oriented to the command line. Even though I want to learn how to use it, I would prefer to learn about what's behind it. I believe I already found a good book to learn the command line: Linux fundamentals, by Paul Cobbaut. Seems ok, maybe you've heard of it. Do you have comments about it?

    To be more clear, I'm not that interested in programming, but understanding how computer works. I only read "The C programming language" because the Linux Kernel is written in C and assembly, and I'd like to participate in a project related to the kernel someday.

    Quote Originally Posted by Segfault View Post
    Linux is everywhere, and so are Linux users. There is always someone who already did what you want to do. Thus, searching skills are paramount to advance fast.
    I know:

    Quote Originally Posted by CarterCox View Post
    I know this question has been asked repeatedly, but I was wondering if I could get some personalized advice, by letting you know what my background in CS is, and what my goals are.
    My goal is not really advancing fast, but advancing properly. I have other things to do while I wait for someone to point me in the right direction. In my experience, what you learn in a forum can't be replaced by Google. Maybe you've read a book you can recommend?

    Thank you both for the help!

  6. #5
    Linux Guru Segfault's Avatar
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    OK, let me rephrase. Replace 'advancing fast' with 'not getting stuck'.
    Anyhow, this is open source. I've always learned by doing and same time reading relevant information to understand what I'm doing. You want to learn kernel. Get the sources from kernel.org and try to configure and build your own kernel for starters. Read the documentation which comes with kernel sources. Horizons will open in front of you and you will know how to proceed.

  7. #6
    Linux Engineer drl's Avatar
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    Hi.

    In looking into a sample of:
    Code:
    Mastering Linux - Fundamentals
    Mar 13, 2016
    by Paul Cobbaut
    at Amazon, the Table of Contents looks good. In a quick perusal of a chapter, I saw a minor typo. There was only one review, 5-stars, consisting of nice! in its entirely.

    You may wish to look over the Stevens/Rago book https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ind...=9780321637734

    A Wikipedia article discusses it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanc...ix_Environment

    I would not call it a kernel-specific book, but kernel is mentioned about 200 times. With Amazon you can Look Inside, to see if that is more of what you are looking for. It has 60+ reviews, average 4.6.

    I have the first edition, and I am tempted to get this 3rd edition because of the expanded list of topics.

    It's been a long time since I built a kernel (to compile in support for more than one CPU), but I agree with Segfault. Doing is a really good way of learning for most people. Teaching is another. Those two have been the best methods I have found so far.

    Good luck ... cheers, drl
    Welcome - get the most out of the forum by reading forum basics and guidelines: click here.
    90% of questions can be answered by using man pages, Quick Search, Advanced Search, Google search, Wikipedia.
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  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Segfault View Post
    OK, let me rephrase. Replace 'advancing fast' with 'not getting stuck'.
    Anyhow, this is open source. I've always learned by doing and same time reading relevant information to understand what I'm doing. You want to learn kernel. Get the sources from kernel.org and try to configure and build your own kernel for starters. Read the documentation which comes with kernel sources. Horizons will open in front of you and you will know how to proceed.
    Yes! I have been poking around the Kernel Newbies website. I will start with one of their projects when I get the time. Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by drl View Post
    Hi.

    In looking into a sample of:
    Code:
    Mastering Linux - Fundamentals
    Mar 13, 2016
    by Paul Cobbaut
    at Amazon, the Table of Contents looks good. In a quick perusal of a chapter, I saw a minor typo. There was only one review, 5-stars, consisting of nice! in its entirely.

    You may wish to look over the Stevens/Rago book [...]

    A Wikipedia article discusses it: [...]

    I would not call it a kernel-specific book, but kernel is mentioned about 200 times. With Amazon you can Look Inside, to see if that is more of what you are looking for. It has 60+ reviews, average 4.6.

    I have the first edition, and I am tempted to get this 3rd edition because of the expanded list of topics.

    It's been a long time since I built a kernel (to compile in support for more than one CPU), but I agree with Segfault. Doing is a really good way of learning for most people. Teaching is another. Those two have been the best methods I have found so far.

    Good luck ... cheers, drl
    I never thought to look for Amazon reviews. That's a good idea. I'll keep searching that way. I'll look 9ver your recommendations as well. Thank you!

    Sent from my Moto G Play using Tapatalk

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