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hi, i am a new college grad and i wanted to spend some of my free time to open source development. but i am not sure how i can find ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined!
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    Feb 2005
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    open source development


    hi,
    i am a new college grad and i wanted to spend some of my free time to open source development. but i am not sure how i can find out about different open source projects that are willing to consider offering membership to a new college grad.

    any links to projects/repositories will help.

    moreover, how do/can i prove to the group that i can/willing to conribute?

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast scientica's Avatar
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    Sep 2003
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    South- or "Mid-" Sweden
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    Well, there are many ways to get started with OpenSource coding. One is to simply fix some bug in an OpenSource app or contribute by reading eg the "TODO" file in the source and try to "do it" - in some cases you might find an email to one of the developpers in either the "TODO" or "README" file - I'm sure they'd be delighted over getting a mail from someone asking if (s)he could help.


    The best way to show your willingness to code is by doing it (no one expects to you code 24/7 in a OpenSource project, so anyone that contributes by coding is at least mentioned in the credits/about screen/etc - to give an example: if you use firefox or any mozilla/gecko broswser, you can type "about:credits" in the address bar and you'll see that big/hughe projects remember the people who made it big). Also, most OpenSource projects are un the GPL (GNU Plublic License) which in short forces software to be free (as in free speech, not free beer - though, most software is free in both meanings ) and it's also says that anyone may do what ever (s)he likes with the code (basically "restrictions" only applies when making it publically avalible (eg you must make sure the source is avalible, which is quite natural for OpenSource though :P) - also, moral/ethics puts reasonable 'limits' (eg you don't 'steal' code and put only your own name on it (*cough* *cough* or put it in comercial-close-sources OS *cough* *cough* ))).

    SourceForge ( http://sourceforge.net ) and Freshmeat ( http://freshmeat.net ) are two big sites hosting/listing OpenSource software.

    Happy Coding Armen
    Regards Scienitca (registered user #335819 - http://counter.li.org )
    --
    A master is nothing more than a student who knows something of which he can teach to other students.

  3. #3
    Linux Engineer
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    Like already mentioned, the best way to get involved with an open source project is to write code. No need to ask permission, the GPL makes that clear. If you see something that needs fixing, some way of doing something better, add a cool new feature, etc, send the maintainer(s) the patch and see if they'll put it in.

    A common misconception about Freshmeat.net is that is is all open source software. This is not true, there's a bit of commercial and closed source stuff there too. If you're looking for open source stuff from freshmeat, be sure to check which licensce it falls under.

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