Find the answer to your Linux question:
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Can someone please explain breifly why there are so many directories in linux, and why can it not be set out a little more like windows? I know i know, ...
Enjoy an ad free experience by logging in. Not a member yet? Register.
  1. #1
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    131

    Directory Structure


    Can someone please explain breifly why there are so many directories in linux, and why can it not be set out a little more like windows?

    I know i know, becoming like windows is not a good thing i agree, but the simplicity of it is brilliant. What i would like to see happen is a Linux directory which includes all the bin etc, and loads of other files
    a programs directory to hold the individual programs in there own subdirectory
    And then the Usr directory as it is.

    Does anyone else see this a logical or is it just me?

  2. #2
    Linux Guru dylunio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Cymru
    Posts
    4,157
    An explaination of the Linux Filesystem Heirarchy

    I personnaly still find it confusing, but a lot less confusing than in windows which I found dis-jointed.

    dylunio
    Registered Linux User #371543!
    Get force-get May The Source Be With You
    /dev/null
    /dev/null2

  3. #3
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Serbia&Montenegro
    Posts
    281
    I like the way it is and I would never change it for Windows type.
    Linux registered user #358842
    Human knowledge belongs to the world.

  4. #4
    Linux Engineer
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    home
    Posts
    796
    Linux directory is clean and simple. Windows directory is disgusting and pitiful. The link to the filesystem heirarchy does a great job of explaining it all.

  5. #5
    Linux User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    288
    I think the reason it tends to be confusing is because so few distributions maintain the simplicity. You so often find distro built packages in /usr/local, for example, and then /opt goes unused. Then there's man.conf which, for some reason, sits in /usr/share/misc by default. And is it just me, or does it drive anyone else insane to see a distro pile all sorts of stuff directly under root? Even seeing the kernel there gets to me.

    Now that I'm used to it and have a distro that does it right, I like the layout. It's almost like a search filter, limiting your results to libraries, configs, logs, or wherever it is you're working. The only real downside I see is that it's difficult to think holistically when you first start out. But then, with Windows it's difficult to ever think in such a way, it's such a counter-intuitive mess.

    I just wish the home directory would be limited to dot files and really private stuff, and leave storage to a public /data directory. Unfortunately it would require a major change to the mindset of FOSS developers, since most everything defaults to your home directory. I wish they would at least default to root when opening or saving a file.

    Anyway, if it's what you really want, you might check out Gobo Linux, they do things like unify programs under single directories, mostly with symlinks. I think Rubyx does similar things as well.

    [ethyriel@demerzel /data]# rant --set 0
    Michael Salivar

    Man knows himself insofar as he knows the world, becoming aware of it only in himself, and of himself only within it.
    --Goethe

  6. #6
    Linux Newbie
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    131
    Maybe it is just because i don't really understand the linux system. I will be learning it now. Thanks for the great link

  7. #7
    Just Joined!
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Ghana
    Posts
    35
    its a good thing u are learning the directory structure, it is your getway to getting Linux handy. checq /etc, this di gets essential configuration like apache(httpd.conf), samba(smb.conf) and security configuration.

    jump into the /bin and get use to most of the commands and utilites that root uses. find the diff b/n the /bin and the /usr/sbin.

    now also that ur home directories for use accounts are in the /home and many more interesting stuffs.

    it's the best arranged dir tree by far.

    urs in Linux

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •