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thats a damn shame, when MS finaly colapses nvidia will hit the big time (bigger time ;))...
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  1. #11
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    thats a damn shame, when MS finaly colapses nvidia will hit the big time (bigger time ;))

  2. #12
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    Hehe... When MS finally collapses... When are you estimating - a week or two? My guess is Aug 20th; do you want to have a bet about it? =)

  3. #13
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    sure.. i bet 3 swedish Krona or euros or whatnot it happens before the next ice age...

  4. #14
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    You guys... I'm sure Bill Gates is loving every minute of your insults at Microsoft.
    So is nvdia the way to go in Linux? I honestly don't want to upgrade my video card once I buy it. I'm very economical when it comes to hardware. I won't upgrade it unless I absolutely need to.
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  5. #15
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    If you want 3D acceleration, then nVidia is the way to go. If you don't, then it doesn't really matter. Of course, nVidia's driver makes the 2D acceleration fast as well, but 2D is fast for almost any card.

  6. #16
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    Dolda,

    How stable are the drivers? Could you recommend a specific card?
    If I need 3D acceleration, it'll probably related to openGl since I plan to learn that sometime soon. Otherwise, for video games I'll be using them in... Windows.
    The best things in life are free.

  7. #17
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    Nowadays, I find the drivers relatively stable. Sometimes when I change display mode, especially to and from my TV, they crash and give a kernel panic, but it's still not very often. They are very fast in any case.
    All nVidia cards are essentially the same, only that new features are added and performance is improved. If you intend to experiment on pixel and vertex shading, you should be getting a GeForce 3, GeForce 4 Ti (not MX) or later.

  8. #18
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    Is there any specific card that you can recommend? I very much trust your judgement when it comes to computers.
    The best things in life are free.

  9. #19
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    Well, if you only really need 2D acceleration, I'd really recommend you to go pick up some old Cirrus Logic or S3 card or the like. Just make sure in advance that it can handle the resolutions that you want.
    If you want 3D acceleration, however, then nVidia is probably the best bet as of today, but it doesn't make any difference which nVidia card you choose, since they are all based on the same architecture. If you don't really need support for like 100 billion polygons with a million simultaneous light sources with raytraced shadows and pixel/vertex shaders on 2048x1536 with 32 BPP, just get an old GF2MX or something, to cut down on the price a bit. The latest 3D acceleration is just ridiculously expensive, and if you aren't a real gamer, I'd say that it's basically just a waste of money.

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