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Hello, fine users of the Linux! I've got into a bit of bother. My 10gig disk used to store my /home directory (one big ext2 patition) has died. Mozst of ...
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  1. #1
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    Recovering files from an ext2 data dump


    Hello, fine users of the Linux!

    I've got into a bit of bother. My 10gig disk used to store my /home directory (one big ext2 patition) has died.

    Mozst of the data's still there, but the filesystem's corrupt and it won't mount.

    I can use dd_rescue to copy across the data either into a safe partition on my new 200gb SATA or into a file on a safe partition on the SATA.

    However, I don't know how to get the individual files back out of the raw data dump.

    Does anybody know of any programs I can use, or have any methods?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Linux Enthusiast puntmuts's Avatar
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    You can restore a file / a partition using the dd command if you do not have errors. You could also mount the file using the loopback. More info: http://www2.knightcast.org/~alex/howtos/dd-howto.php and on the page you provided as well, section purpose .

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    Well, this is the problme. I already tried to mount the dumped file, but I got the same problem as when I tried to mount the partition on the original disk.

    Not knowing enough about how filesystems work, I don't know exactly what bit's been damaged, but I'm guessing it's the ext2 equivalent of a file allocation table (been on Windoze a looooong time before Linux).

    All I need is something that'll detect where all the files are, and the boundaries (if any) between them - or even just rebuild the damaged part that's stopping it from mounting.

    As far as I can tell, dd_rescue acts just like vanilla dd, but it ignores any errors along the way.

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  5. #4
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    Ah, I reckon I've narrowed it down. Despite the disk being very old, it's possible that its time has not yet come. It became corrupt after a kernel crash, you see. I thought at the time that the kernel crashed because the disk became corrupt, but since then I've had another crash (don't know what's happening there) without any secondary symptoms.

    So now I think that it was the other way around - maybe the kernel crashed while it was doing something to an inode table, and because it didn't finish the job, the data structure is all messed up.

    If this is the case, does it make it any easier to fix?

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