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I have Windows installed on this hard-drive. I found an extra HD lying around, and decided to embark on an amazing adventure: Linux Land. I downloaded Fedora Core 3, and ...
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  1. #1
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    Which distro is the most bug-free/complete?


    I have Windows installed on this hard-drive. I found an extra HD lying around, and decided to embark on an amazing adventure: Linux Land. I downloaded Fedora Core 3, and the installation ran smoothly. However, it would only boot up to a grey screen with a mouse cursor. Some key combinations would do different things, usually involving ctrl+alt, but overall I could find no fix, despite many people trying to help me. I reinstalled several times with no luck. GRUB wouldn't work either. I went through a large ammount of troubleshooting with no working fix.

    I then Installed Ubuntu. It worked! No grey screen, and no 4 discs to dl/install. It was cool, but I ran into some annoyances. (I'll get to that later) I then tried Kubuntu, and while impressed with the interface, the software package was nowhere near the quality of the gnome one. Then I tried the 32-bit version of gnome ubuntu, as the 64-bit was probably causing some of my issues, eg flash. It didn't even fix that one.

    I'm wondering if a different distro could fix some of my problems, or if you just have a favorite to recommend. Here are some issues. It's a little slower than Windows. I can't get my soundcard working, no drivers for it, but onboard audio works. (I use both, one for speakers, one for phones, different apps output to different devices.) The only games that work that I have are UT2k4 (extremely poor fps, a few features don't work.) and Doom3. (won't install right, gives me errors like so many other things i Linux.) Even if I could get them working, I can't figure out how to enable AA/AF/TB/Vsync etc. There's no way to minimize them as far as I know either, and advanced things like widescreen (blackbar style) are probably out of the question entirely. In general, it seems that Linux makes it very difficult to manage files and write to the disk. It's doable, but not withotu a hassle. To do basic things like change the resolution and fix the files the install wrote wrong require moderately complex sets of console commands... no big deal right? It would be if it were possible to follow these instructions without getting errors left and right. I still can't get the new vid card drivers working at all, and I can't get restricted modules; well it says I have them after followign some steps, but it still says I dont' when I need them. Other annoyances include it being very difficult and requireing a restart to change resolution, and huge icons that waste space. It's also a pain to get extra mouse buttons working, althogh I was able to do that with no errors.

    Basically what I'm trying to say is this: Is there a distro of Linux that doens't try to be a pain in the rear whenever possible? I LOVE the concept of open-source concepts, and the bullying and frivolous lawsuits Microsoft is pulling makes me angry. I'd like to experiment with Linux more, but is there an easier way? Also, there should be a command to the effect of "sudo itsmyfukingharddriveletmewritetoit"

  2. #2
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    i would go with ubuntu, fedora, or knoppix for starters. There easy, they have little or no gliches, and there secure and come with alot of software. To experiment with linux, give knoppix 3.8 a try. Its a live Cd so theres no install. just pop it in the drive, instant linux
    Linux is for those who want to know why their computer works.

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  3. #3
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    Re: Which distro is the most bug-free/complete?

    Quote Originally Posted by Curlydave
    I'd like to experiment with Linux more, but is there an easier way?
    In my opinion, there is no easier way - experimenting to find "your distro" is the key to success. Everybody has their likes and dislikes, and they use different applications on different hardware, so where you find perfection the other guy/gal might find a pile of bugs.

    Hope you find the distro that comes most near to suiting your needs.

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    Linux Guru Cabhan's Avatar
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    Although everyone of course has their own preferences, I was a big fan of SuSE back when I used it. Very user-friendly and worked quite well. It's actually commercial software, but the Pro 9.2 can be downloaded from their website.


    As far as your second question, a lot of stuff is controlled by the /etc/fstab file. If you want to write to a drive, you need to ensure that you are mounting it with the rw (read/write) option, and not the ro (read/something-else).

    If you don't mount with rw, you will be unable to write, even as root.

  6. #5
    Linux Engineer psic's Avatar
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    I found Suse and Mepis the easiest to work with, install, configure...
    Stumbling around the 'net:
    www.cloudyuseful.com

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    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Which distro is best for you can only be determined by you. Try a bunch out and see which you like the most. Everyone on this forum will recommend a different distribution; it's like asking what your favorite flavor of ice cream is. I also call your attention to this thread.
    Registered Linux user #270181
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  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cabhan
    ...and not the ro (read/something-else).
    I think it is read-only

  9. #8
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    you can also check out TechieMoe's reviews, which are wonderful in getting the feel for the distros, though there's one I disagree with--ahem, gentoo--I find them wonderful guidelines.
    Operating System: GNU Emacs

  10. #9
    Linux Guru techieMoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by genesus
    you can also check out TechieMoe's reviews, which are wonderful in getting the feel for the distros, though there's one I disagree with--ahem, gentoo--I find them wonderful guidelines.
    A point genesus brings up is that you're not expected to agree with my views on these distros, but you can at least use them to learn a little bit about them, and decide from there whether or not you want to try them out yourself.
    Registered Linux user #270181
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  11. #10
    Linux Guru budman7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by genesus
    you can also check out TechieMoe's reviews, which are wonderful in getting the feel for the distros, though there's one I disagree with--ahem, gentoo--I find them wonderful guidelines.
    And they are a lot of fun to read :P
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