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Recently copied some files from an ntfs drive (read only) to me linux partition. Problem is it's set them all with read only permissions Since I have about 500 files ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Engineer
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    batch processing of permissions?


    Recently copied some files from an ntfs drive (read only) to me linux partition. Problem is it's set them all with read only permissions

    Since I have about 500 files wassa best way of setting them to write access? They also belong to root, but not to bothered about that.

    RH9

    Ta

  2. #2
    Linux Engineer kriss's Avatar
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    You cant and you shouldnt use ntfs write in GNU/Linux. It will fsck up the filesystem. But you can read from it, and if you bother, you can converrt it to fat32 and write to it. That happens when MS won't tell the spec's of their products

  3. #3
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    are they all in the same directory?

    if so, cd to the dir.

    then "chmod 777 *"

    that will give everyone full permissions to mess with the file.

    better thing to do is:

    "chown user:group * " - this will change ownership of all the files to the user:group specified.

    then..

    "chown 600 * " - to make all the files read/writeable buy the owning user.(set above).

    Jason

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kriss
    You cant and you shouldnt use ntfs write in GNU/Linux. It will fsck up the filesystem. But you can read from it, and if you bother, you can converrt it to fat32 and write to it. That happens when MS won't tell the spec's of their products
    Nah, don't want to write to ntfs, it's just where my archived files happen to be.

  5. #5
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    Ta Jason, appreciated

  6. #6
    Linux Guru sarumont's Avatar
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    And if you have a recursive directory system, throw in the -R switch (chmod -R, chown -R ), and that will fix all the subdirectories.
    "Time is an illusion. Lunchtime, doubly so."
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarumont
    And if you have a recursive directory system, throw in the -R switch (chmod -R, chown -R ), and that will fix all the subdirectories.
    Nice, ta.

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