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Hello forum! I have been tasked with coming up with a business justification for implementing Linux in the corporate network environment where I work. I already have implemented an ejabberd ...
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  1. #1
    Just Joined! adamdaughterson's Avatar
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    Business Justification For Implementing Linux


    Hello forum! I have been tasked with coming up with a business justification for implementing Linux in the corporate network environment where I work. I already have implemented an ejabberd server for the communication between our local portion of the IT helpdesk and the offshore portion. This has worked remarkably well, and because of this, it has also come to the attention of the higer-up's that Linux has "invaded" their precious Windows network.

    As an aside, a few years back another couple Linux boxes were implemented for certain mission critical webapps using JRun and RedHat. The implementation was horribly sloppy and has made the current IT dept. very hesitant to venture in that direction again.

    The purpose of my post is to gather as many personal reasons for using Linux instead of Windows as I can and use the underlying motif as my business justification. I know my own reasons, but that list is neither objective, nor robust.

    Thanks,

    Adam

  2. #2
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    Which parts of your current business process do you intend for Linux machinery to replace? That will be a much easier starting point than going for vague reasons to switch.

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    Personally, I use Linux for political reasons. I am opposed to the way Microsoft shafts their customers. I am opposed to proprietary and incompatible protocols. And I believe that the future of the human race lies with ideas like GNU/FSF and GPL, and not with the corporately driven marketing scams that most Wintel-based computer companies subscribe to. In short, Linux is proof that revolution is possible.

    Doubt that helps your company too much!

    How about the fact that Linux is free? How about that fact that Linux was built around coming to places like this and asking questions and getting answers (some of the people hanging around here know more about computers than any telephone tech support person on the planet)? How about the fact that Windows viruses have no effect on Linux systems whatsoever?

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    From a business angle you can say that there's a longer uptime which means that you can keep the servers on longer not to mention that if you work on the machines there will be less of a need to restart as often. There's also the fact that there's basically no viruses or spyware. This leads to less breakdowns of the systems. and that adds up to a dollar amount which companies like. There's the fact that most distros are free and come with everything you need for whatever needs you have. Some of these things are Open Office, Firefox, and other things depending on the individual distro. You would be saving money in the long run even if you had to train your IT guys on Linux a bit it would all work out good for them down the road.

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    Linux User benjamin20's Avatar
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    upgrads! upgrades! upgrades! in the windows world, you upgrade and you pay, and its not realy all that neccissary or good of an upgrade. linux, upgradeing is simple and free, also, there is usualy no real radical changes when you upgrade, since everything works so well already and its already costomizable, there is no room for drastic changes as the linux community knows better.
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    Personaly id mention the windows licenses for client systems on machines..company i work for already uses samba and ldap. Also if the bosses mention accountability get them to read the window elua(basically states that microsoft are not acountable for window errors)

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    Linux Engineer psic's Avatar
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    When looking at it from a buisness perspective, I'd say the uptime is one of the biggest factors. It's all about stability, really. Things like viri and worms are said to cost companies ridiculous amounts of money every year. That is, if they use windows. Obviously, the cost is a factor, but IMHO not the biggest.

    edit: Oh, and I use linux because it works better than the alternative.
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    Just Joined! adamdaughterson's Avatar
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    anomie:

    Which parts of your current business process do you intend for Linux machinery to replace?
    We have 2 Redhat servers built by someone in India (seriously...) designed for JRun servlets, and I have built an ejabberd cluster that hosts the IM and conferencing between our local IT and our agents in the Phillipines. The aforementioned Redhat boxes are hopelessly out of date and run fairly badly. I have tried to tune them up to the best of my abilities, but have not the experience with JRun and Redhat to make any positive changes.

    Now I am tasked with producing some sort of presentation/documentation detailing "Why the organization shouldn't just use MSN Messenger and scrap this whole failed Linux thing..." and, as I stated before, I can come up with many reasons why I personally use Linux. Unfortunately, these reasons have never been enough to sway the intent naysayer. For some reason, they seem to think that Free=Second Rate. Silly...

    I appreciate all of your reasons. It strengthens my own resolve, for, my home system is a Slackware 7 Dell Precision420. It's been up and running since 2002, and the only problems I've had with it have been hardware failures! That is why I use Linux: with very little investment (time) I have a system that I know will work perfectly well every time I boot it. I certainly cannot say the same for my WinWorkstation...

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    if the support company provided them then theres a good chance that they 1 only support thatparticular peice of software and 2 they may provide support.

  11. #10
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    adamdaughterson,

    I don't know what your timeline looks like, but it sounds like they (i.e. management) have already put you on the defensive. You will need to set up a proof-of-concept system to demonstrate that this can be implemented in a way that will perform as they would like it to.

    After (and only after) that has been done you can extol some of Linux's finer points: namely, reliability and security.

    P.S. I would be careful about trying to sell this as: "Linux is free". That is not a true statement, because you need to pay sysadmins. If they are not already familiar with Linux, they will need extensive training to do the job well, and that all costs money.

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