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Hi folks, On running following command # ls -al Working/ | grep blfs Code: -rw-rw-r-- 1 1000 users 28619 Sep 10 2005 blfs_build_050909a.txt What does "1000 users" refer to. How ...
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  1. #1
    Linux Guru
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    What is "1000 users"


    Hi folks,

    On running following command
    # ls -al Working/ | grep blfs
    Code:
    -rw-rw-r--   1    1000 users    28619 Sep 10  2005 blfs_build_050909a.txt
    What does "1000 users" refer to. How it came to user=1000 group=users?

    TIA

    B.R.
    satimis

  2. #2
    Linux Guru fingal's Avatar
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    If that's your desktop computer and you're using it at home, then something strange is going on! Maybe you're on a network at a college or university??

    Or perhaps there are more people living in your house than you think
    I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

  3. #3
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    Re: What is "1000 users"

    Quote Originally Posted by satimis
    Hi folks,

    On running following command
    # ls -al Working/ | grep blfs
    Code:
    -rw-rw-r--   1    1000 users    28619 Sep 10  2005 blfs_build_050909a.txt
    What does "1000 users" refer to. How it came to user=1000 group=users?

    TIA

    B.R.
    satimis
    unix in geral does not use names to I.D users, Users are reconised by a number. Ill give ye an example. Say if my user has the users ID of 1004 and i access a NFS share, and I access a file that is owned by user 1004. It does not matter if the user on the other system is known as Slartibartfast.
    All i want for christmas is a new liver....a second chance to get afflicted with Cirrhosis

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  5. #4
    Linux Engineer
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    its quite a security hole if you dont cover it with kerberos or somtihng

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by variant
    its quite a security hole if you dont cover it with kerberos or somtihng
    But if its a home network then its not that important
    All i want for christmas is a new liver....a second chance to get afflicted with Cirrhosis

  7. #6
    Super Moderator Roxoff's Avatar
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    It's not really that important for your home use - if you have copied some file from another machine and it's preserved user attributes, then you will see things like this.

    Try adding a user to /etc/passwd with the user ID of 1000, and it'll list that username when you do an ls -l...
    Linux user #126863 - see http://linuxcounter.net/

  8. #7
    Linux Guru anomie's Avatar
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    uid=1000 is a common starting point for regular user accounts.

  9. #8
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    Hi folks,

    Tks for your advice.

    I became aware of such thing on copying files from FC3, the host, to BLFS 6.1 and vice versa (on running BLFS). It was not on chroot only mounting /dev/hda6 (/mnt/lfs). After copying the owner and group of the files were changed to "number" and "users". The files can't be edited as "read" only. I must change them back. Is there a solution?

    B.R.
    satimis

  10. #9
    scm
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    Quote Originally Posted by satimis
    Hi folks,

    Tks for your advice.

    I became aware of such thing on copying files from FC3, the host, to BLFS 6.1 and vice versa (on running BLFS). It was not on chroot only mounting /dev/hda6 (/mnt/lfs). After copying the owner and group of the files were changed to "number" and "users". The files can't be edited as "read" only. I must change them back. Is there a solution?

    B.R.
    satimis
    How did you copy the files? If you did it from a tar or cpio archive as root then the user and group IDs will be propagated - the userid on the archive obviously was 1000, which doesn't exist on your system. As root, chown the user and group to something that'll have write permissions and you're done!

  11. #10
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    Hi scm,

    How did you copy the files? If you did it from a tar or cpio archive as root then the user and group IDs will be propagated....
    The property of the files before copied to /mnt/lfs were "satimis:satimis"(user:user). As root
    # cp /path/to/files /mnt/lfs/home/user/

    Previously I did not recognize that the property of those files changed. Untill recently I discovered those files copied to BLFS 6.1 were "read only"

    satimis

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